Video: Opioid overdose

Contents
  1. Overdose Videos
  2. Worth Saving
  3. I’m the Evidence Video Campaign: Naloxone Works!
  4. PSA: Rescue Breathe to Prevent Fatal Overdose
  5. San Francisco Department of Public Health Police Video
  6.  Staying Alive on the Outside
  7. Project Lazarus Patient Education Video
  8. Operation OpioidSAFE
  9. NYC Department of Health
  10. Saving Lives with Overdose Prevention – Boston Public Health
  11. How to Assemble a Nasal Naloxone (Narcan) Rescue Kit – Boston Public Health
  12. Washington State 911 Good Samaritan Law
  13. Naloxone administration is childs play
  14. Cómo Prevenir un Sobredosis de Opioides
  15. Take Home Naloxone: The Right to Survive Overdoses (HCLU)
  16. LIVE! Using Injectable Naloxone to Reverse Opiate Overdose
  17. 10 Minute Naloxone Training
  18. Opioid Medication Safety: The Role of Naloxone
  19. Harm Reductionists Talk about Opiate Overdose Mortality Prevention
  20. Shelly’s Story
  21. Current & Former NC Drug Users Talk About Overdose
  22. Lieutenant Detective Pat Glynn: Saving Lives with Narcan
  23. Harm Reduction Conference 2011 – Naloxone Panel
  24. Basic Life Support: Use of Naloxone
  25. Naloxone: Preventing Opioid Overdose in the Community
  26. Awareness resources for opioids
  27. On this page:
  28. Opioid Epidemic Initiatives
  29. Tune in for the Release of Fentanyl: The Real Deal
  30. D.A.R.E. LAUNCHES K-12 OPIOID AND OTC/RX PREVENTION CURRICULA
  31. Stopping the Opioid Crisis Begins at Home
  32. Surgeon General’s Advisory on Naloxone and Opioid Overdose
  33. Diamond Pharmacy Services Releases “Naloxone Use in the Management of Opioid Overdose” in December 2017
  34.  
  35. Device could automatically deliver drug to reverse opioid overdose
  36. Opioid Overdose
  37. Who is at Risk of an Opioid Overdose?
  38. How to Provide Care
  39. Treatment for Opioid Overdose
  40. A Word About the Signs and Symptoms of Substance Abuse and Misuse

Overdose Videos

Video: Opioid overdose

In this video by Joshua Vinehout, NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services, Officers from the New York Police Department speak candidly about their administering of naloxone (Narcan) to prevent and reverse opioid overdoses.

Worth Saving

This compassionate short video follows two drug users through a groundbreaking program that teaches the signs of drug overdose, and the basic CPR needed to save lives.

DOPE (Drug Overdose Prevention and Training) works in needle exchanges, shelters and SRO hotels, as well as with the police, addressing the needs of the often forgotten casualties of the ‘war on drugs.

’ In conjunction with the city’s Department of Public Health, the DOPE project takes the bold step of prescribing the opioid antidote Narcan (naloxone – usually only carried by paramedics) directly to drug users.

I’m the Evidence Video Campaign: Naloxone Works!

This campaign seeks to raise awareness about overdose prevention as well as improve worldwide access to naloxone and funding for its distribution. Watch here.

PSA: Rescue Breathe to Prevent Fatal Overdose

This 30-second bit is to remind folks to rescue breathe if they find someone who had an opiate-related overdose. Rescue Breathing can buy time until the ambulance arrives or waiting for naloxone to work. *This is not CPR* Just put your mouth on theirs and breathe.

San Francisco Department of Public Health Police Video

Training video on syringe access and overdose prevention education for police officers.

 Staying Alive on the Outside

This short video explains the heightened risk of overdose that people recently released from prison and other places of detention face. It teaches viewers how to prevent and recognize opioid overdoses, and how to intervene when they happen. The video is meant to accompany naloxone distribution, either as part of release planning in a correctional facility, or in the community.

Project Lazarus Patient Education Video

In response to some of the highest drug overdose death rates in the country, Project Lazarus developed a community-based overdose prevention program in Wilkes County and western North Carolina that focused on increasing access to naloxone for prescription opioid users.

Operation OpioidSAFE

Video produced by All Pro Media for the US ARMY at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina to promote safer use of prescription opioids.

NYC Department of Health

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Drug Overdose Prevention: 1. How to Prevent Drug Overdose. 2. Are You at Risk for Drug Overdose? 3. Emergency Overdose Instructions. 4. Help and Support.

Saving Lives with Overdose Prevention – Boston Public Health

Drug overdose is the #1 cause of accidental death in Massachusetts. Here’s how some extremely dedicated coalitions have been tackling ODs.

How to Assemble a Nasal Naloxone (Narcan) Rescue Kit – Boston Public Health

This video trains you how to help an overdose victim with a Nasal Naloxone (Narcan) rescue kit.

Washington State 911 Good Samaritan Law

Seattle Police Department training video about Washington state’s 911 Good Samaritan Law, Naloxone distribution, and StopOverdose.org website.

Naloxone administration is childs play

This short film of simulated overdose and naloxone administration is to show how simple it can be to save a life. No one needs to die of an overdose.

Cómo Prevenir un Sobredosis de Opioides

En este video aprendemos lo que occure durante un sobredosis de opioides, cómo prevenir un sobredosis, y cómo ayudar a alguien si tiene un sobredosis.

Take Home Naloxone: The Right to Survive Overdoses (HCLU)

The movie is not simply about commemorating those who have passed, nor is it about shaming or blaming. The film highlights the fact that deaths due to overdose  are preventable using cheap and effective methods that do not stigmatize or criminalize people who use drugs.

LIVE! Using Injectable Naloxone to Reverse Opiate Overdose

This documentary-stye training film, made in association with Chicago Recovery Alliance (www.anypositivechange.

org), provides instruction on how to recognize opioid overdose and respond effectively using a combination of rescue breathing and injectable naloxone, a pure opiate antagonist.

An actual overdose, caught on film in November 2008, provides the narrative framework in which the opiate overdose rescue process is illuminated.

10 Minute Naloxone Training

Quick review of the use and affects of the drug Naloxone AKA Narcan. This video is procuced for Fremont County Ambulance.

Opioid Medication Safety: The Role of Naloxone

Essential information for people who take opioids for pain and doctors who are interested in prescribing naloxone when they prescribe opioids. This video provides easy training on opioid safety and how to use naloxone.

Harm Reductionists Talk about Opiate Overdose Mortality Prevention

Produced, shot and edited by Hadley Gustafson for North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition.

Shelly’s Story

Family tragedy compels mother and son BJ and Chad Sanders to share their loss, advocating for saving lives in North Carolina with both 911 Good Samaritan law and Naloxone access.

Producer, interviewer, videographer, editor and animator Hadley Gustafson for NCHRC.

This short furthers an overdose mortality prevention triptych working first with professional advocates (harm reductionists), then with users, and now with families.

Current & Former NC Drug Users Talk About Overdose

A group of current & former North Carolina drug users gathered to talk about overdoses they’ve experienced or witnessed, the repercussions of calling or not calling 911, and how Good Samaritan 911 laws (granting immunity from drug possession charges to those who respond to an overdose by calling 911) and increased access to Naloxone (or Narcan, an opiate antagonist that can reverse the effects of an overdose) could save lives. The discussion was moderated by NCHRC Harm Reduction Coordinator Tessie Castillo.

Lieutenant Detective Pat Glynn: Saving Lives with Narcan

Lieutenant Detective Pat Glynn, Commander: Special Investigations/Narcotics Unit of the Quincy, Massachusetts Police Department, shares some impressive results, where opiate overdose deaths have been greatly reduced by officers carrying Naloxone, or Narcan. Recorded at the Law Enforcement Safety and Drug Policy Summit, coordinated by the North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition, June 12th, 2012, in Raleigh, NC.

Harm Reduction Conference 2011 – Naloxone Panel

This video was filmed at the 2011 International Harm Reduction Conference in Beirut, Lebanon. It features Eliza Wheeler from The DOPE Project, Dasha Ocheret from Eurasian Harm Reduction Network and Stephen Malloy  from Scottish Drugs Forum.

Basic Life Support: Use of Naloxone

This training video was produced by the New York State Department of Health’s Bureau of Emergency Medical Services and co-sponsored by Harm Reduction Coalition on how to administer intranasal naloxone in response to an opioid overdose.

Naloxone: Preventing Opioid Overdose in the Community

This video is a learning module produced by New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute Clinical Education Initiative (CEI) for clinicians and public health professionals wishing to continue their medical education.

Source: https://harmreduction.org/issues/overdose-prevention/tools-best-practices/overdose-videos/

Awareness resources for opioids

Video: Opioid overdose

Browse through the following selections for opioid education resources.

On this page:

Opioids 101 Type Title Description Published Date Format
Video End stigma campaign Stigma matters because it can prevent people who use drugs from getting help. People who are stigmatised often feel ashamed, alone and judged. Together we can help end stigma. 2019-01-21 MP4
Video Opioid Awareness Campaign Opioids prescribed for pain, such as oxycodone and fentanyl, can lead to overdose and death if used improperly. 2018-11-19 MP4
Video Good Samaritan Law Stay until help arrives. The Good Samaritan Law can protect you. 2019-10-05 MP4
Opioid fact sheets Type Title Description Published Date Format
Fact sheet Canada’s Opioid Crisis This fact sheet provides information about Canada’s opioid crisis and actions taken by the Government of Canada to address this crisis. March 2019 PDF
Fact sheet Opioids: What Are They? This fact sheet provides information on what opioids are, the difference between legal and illegal opioids and what you should do if you are prescribed an opioid. March 2019 PDF
Fact sheet Opioid Overdoses: What To Do This fact sheet explains how opioids can cause an overdose and how to protect yourself from one. It also provides information on what to do if you witness or suspect an overdose (call, stay and help). March 2019 PDF
Fact sheet Naloxone: Save a Life This fact sheet provides information on naloxone and how it can save a life during an opioid overdose. March 2019 PDF
Fact sheet Problematic Opioid Use This fact sheet provides information on problematic opioid use and how to get help. March 2019 PDF
Fact sheet Stigma: Why Words Matter This fact sheet provides information on stigma, why our words matter and how stigma can affect people who use opioids. March 2019 PDF
Fact sheet Talking to Your Health Care Provider About Opioids This fact sheet provides information that can help when talking to a health care provider about opioids. March 2019 PDF
Overdose prevention and stigma Type Title Description Published Date Format
Poster End stigma: Poster This poster can be ordered or printed. It can be displayed at public events or within the community to broaden awareness and help reduce stigma. 2019-06-21 PDF
Poster End stigma (friend): Poster This poster can be ordered or printed. It can be displayed at public events or within the community to help broaden awareness and reduce stigma. 2019-06-21 PDF
Poster End stigma (parent): Poster This poster can be ordered or printed. It can be displayed at public events or within the community to broaden awareness and help reduce stigma. 2019-06-21 PDF
Poster End stigma (wife): Poster This poster can be ordered or printed. It can be displayed at public events or within the community to help broaden awareness and reduce stigma. 2019-06-21 PDF
Video CPhA Administering Naloxone Nasal Spray Learn how to administer naloxone nasal spray in a few simple steps in this video.This video was produced by the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) in partnership with the University of Waterloo School of Pharmacy. Its goal is to teach patients and members of the community how to use naloxone nasal spray. The video is meant to be shared with patients as an extra tool for preventing overdose deaths. 2017-03-24 MP4
Video CPhA Naloxone Injection Delivery Learn how to administer a naloxone injection in a few simple steps in this video. This video was produced by the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) in partnership with the University of Waterloo School of Pharmacy. Its goal is to teach patients and members of the community the steps of giving a naloxone injection. The video is meant to be shared with patients as an extra tool for preventing overdose deaths. 2016-11-14 MP4
PDF Changing how we talk about substance use The negative impacts of stigma can be reduced by changing the language we use about substance use. Here are some suggested ways to help reduce stigma in our everyday conversation. 2018 PDF, 95 K
Wallet Cards Opioid overdose: Wallet card This wallet card can be printed or ordered. It can increase awareness of the symptoms of an opioid overdose, the steps to take to save a life, and protections provided by the Good Samaritan law. 2018-04-06 PDF, 204 K
Poster Opioid overdose: poster This poster can be printed and displayed at public events or within the community. It can increase awareness of the symptoms of an opioid overdose and the steps to take to save a life. 2018 PDF, 1074 K
Mirror cling Know More: Suspect an overdose? This mirror cling features the signs of an opioid overdose and information on Canada's Good Samaritan law. 2018 PDF
Mirror cling Know More: Infographic This mirror cling is intended to increase awareness of the dangers of opioids and the crisis in Canada. 2019 PDF
Poster Know More: It can happen to anyone This poster can help educate youth about the dangers of problematic substance use. 2018 PDF
Poster Know More: Can you see the difference? This poster is intended to increase awareness of the dangers of fentanyl. 2018 PDF
Poster Know More: Your first time could be your last time This poster is intended to increase awareness of the dangers of fentanyl and opioid overdoses. 2018 PDF
Poster Know More: There’s power in numbers This poster features the signs of an opioid overdose and information on Canada’s Good Samaritan law. 2018 PDF
Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act Type Title Description Published Date Format
Poster Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act: poster This poster can be printed on letter sized paper or scaled to print larger. It tells Canadians what to do in the case of an opioid overdose and where to get information on the Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act. 2018 PDF, 576 K
Lived experience Type Title Description Published Date Format
Video Meagan's Story Hear Meagan's story about how her prescription drug use quickly turned into an unshakeable problematic substance use. Also find out how she got treatment. 2017-06-30 MP4
Video Tom's Story Discover Tom's story about his dependence on painkillers, how it took over his life and how treatment helped. 2015-05-22 MP4
Video Jordan's Story Listen to Jordan's story and how his dependence on pain medication led to tragedy. 2015-05-22 MP4
Video Karlee's Story Listen to Karlee's story about problematic prescription drug use, its negative effects on her life and how she recovered. 2015-05-22 MP4
Video Etienne's Story Listen to Étienne's story about how his problematic prescription drug use took over his life, and how therapy helped him recover. 2016-11-14 MP4
Video Marie-Louise's Story Listen to Marie-Louise's story about how one pill to help her sleep led to 6 years of problematic prescription drug use, and even jail. Also find out how she got help and recovered. 2016-11-14 MP4
Video Kristina's Story Discover Kristina's story. She is a registered practical nurse who specializes in drug treatment. Every day she sees people suffering the effects of problematic opiate use. She wants anyone suffering with a problematic substance use to know that there are options, and there are really good people out there to help. 2016-11-14 MP4
Video Samuel's Story Hear Samuel's story about his problematic substance use, especially opioids, the negative effects it had on his health and life in general, and how he recovered. 2016-11-14 MP4
Government of Canada actions Type Title Description Published Date Format
PDF Federal Actions on Opioids – Overview This overview identifies the actions taken by the Government of Canada since early 2016 to address the opioid crisis. It also provides a national picture of the public health impact of opioids in Canada. 2019-06-13 PDF, 191 KB
Poster/ PDF Federal approach on Canada's opioid crisis This infographic shows the actions being taken as part of a coordinated pan-Canadian response to the opioid crisis. 2017-06-12 PDF, 220 KB
Infographic Supervised consumption site: poster This poster shows the new simpler application process for supervised consumption sites. The poster tells applicants, communities and Canadians about the application process for each site. 2016-06-10 PDF,152 KB
Infographic Making urgently needed drugs available This poster outlines our public health response to the opioid overdose crisis. 2017-06-27 PDF, 200 KB
Audio series Type Title Description Published Date Format
Audio In Plain Sight In Plain Sight is a Health Canada audio series that explores the personal stories of people affected by the opioid crisis. 2019-05-09 MP3

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Date modified: 2020-02-11

Source: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-use/problematic-prescription-drug-use/opioids/toolkit/awareness-resources.html

Opioid Epidemic Initiatives

Video: Opioid overdose

Jails are on the front lines of this epidemic, and they also are in a unique position to initiate treatment in a controlled, safe environment. Pharmacotherapy—i.e.

, medication-assisted treatment—is a cornerstone of best practice for recovery from substance abuse.

Treatment using MAT, particularly when coupled with evidence-based behavioral therapy, improves medical and mental health outcomes and reduces relapses and recidivism.

Download the PPG >>>

Our Executive Director, Jonathan Thompson, was at the release of Fentanyl: The Real Deal.

“We cannot let our guard down….this not just a law enforcement problem, this is a community problem.”

Watch the replay here: https://www..com/watch?v=UkxT0bgekQ8.

Tune in for the Release of Fentanyl: The Real Deal

America’s first responders—including law enforcement officers, firefighters, and emergency medical services providers—are increasingly ly to encounter fentanyl and other synthetic opioids during the course of their daily activities, such as responding to overdose calls and conducting traffic stops, arrests, and searches.

  To help first responders protect themselves when the presence of fentanyl is suspected or encountered, a Federal Interagency Working Group coordinated by the National Security Council developed Fentanyl Safety Recommendations for First Responders.

The Fentanyl: The Real Deal video, designed for roll call training, reinforces key messages from the Fentanyl Safety Recommendations for First Responders

Join us for the launch of Fentanyl: The Real Deal on August 30, 2018 from 2:00 to 3:30 p.m. ET via: https://www..com/watch?v=UkxT0bgekQ8

D.A.R.E. LAUNCHES K-12 OPIOID AND OTC/RX PREVENTION CURRICULA

America faces an opioid crisis! Every day, more than 115 Americans die after overdosing on opioids.

Experts project it will increase by 19% annually.

D.A.R.E. Responds. D.A.R.E. America has created a comprehensive

K-12 Opioid and OTC/Rx drug abuse prevention lesson program

This curricula package is FREE to D.A.R.E. communities – Learn more!

Stopping the Opioid Crisis Begins at Home

Illinois law enforcement leaders emphasize prevention measures in combatting state-wide crisis.

Opioid abuse and addiction are exacting a grave and growing toll from communities in Illinois and across the country. The death rate from overdoses increases every year, as does the number of babies born with drug dependency.

As parents become addicted to prescription painkillers and then — all too often — to cheaper, illegal opioids such as heroin, our foster care system is becoming overburdened.

When the costs of this drug scourge to employers and to the health and criminal justice systems are factored in, the estimated annual hit to the U.S. economy has reached an astonishing $504 billion.

REPORT: Law Enforcement Leaders say “Stopping the Opioid Crisis Begins at Home”
PRESS RELEASE: Illinois State’s Attorneys, Sheriffs, and Police Chiefs release report on role of prevention in stemming opioid abuse

On November 1, 2017, the White House announced the release of the Fentanyl Safety Recommendations for First Responders. The Recommendations provide first responders with unified, scientific, evidence-based recommendations to protect themselves when the presence of fentanyl is suspected.

The National Sheriffs' Association supports the release of these Recommendations as a critical first step in keeping first responders safe in the field. The Recommendations are the result of a Federal Interagency Working Group coordinated by the White House National Security Council.

Stakeholder associations and organizations representing the medical, public health, law enforcement, Fire/EMS, and occupational safety and health disciplines provided invaluable input to inform the Interagency Working Group’s efforts, and their feedback helped ensure the Recommendations are operationally relevant, appropriately tailored to first responders, and conveyed in a user-friendly one-page format. NSA is one of 24 associations/organizations offering collaborative support for the Recommendations.

Download “Fentanyl: Safety Recommendations for First Responders,” or visit https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/key-issues/fentanyl for more information.

Read more on Fentanyl from the Drug Enforcement Administration: https://www.dea.gov/druginfo/fentanyl.shtml. 

Surgeon General’s Advisory on Naloxone and Opioid Overdose

“I, Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, VADM Jerome Adams, am emphasizing the importance of the overdose-reversing drug naloxone.

For patients currently taking high doses of opioids as prescribed for pain, individuals misusing prescription opioids, individuals using illicit opioids such as heroin or fentanyl, health care practitioners, family and friends of people who have an opioid use disorder, and community members who come into contact with people at risk for opioid overdose, knowing how to use naloxone and keeping it within reach can save a life.”

BE PREPARED. GET NALOXONE. SAVE A LIFE

Diamond Pharmacy Services Releases “Naloxone Use in the Management of Opioid Overdose” in December 2017

READ REPORT

Adapt Pharma® Launches Roll Call Training Video to Educate Law Enforcement on NARCAN® (naloxone HCI) Nasal Spray 4mg: Adapt Pharma, Inc. (www.adaptpharma.

com) today launched a new roll call training video to educate law enforcement on proper administration of NARCAN® (naloxone HCI) Nasal Spray 4mg to help reverse the effects of an opioid overdose.  This roll call instructional video can be downloaded from Narcan.

com/LawEnforcementTrainingVideo and customized to include a personalized introduction from law enforcement leadership.

READ MORE.

VIEW NARCAN ROLL CALL VIDEO.

Email release – Are your officers prepared for an accidental opioid emergency?

Frequently Asked Questions about Emergency Treatment for Opioid Overdose (for first responders)

NARCAN® (naloxone HCI) Nasal Spray Indications and Important Safety Information

During the NSA 2017 Annual Education and Technology Expo in Reno, Neveda, Judge Jeanine Pirro hosted a panel featuring Sheriff Keith Cain (Daviess County, KY), Corporal Michael “Duane” Harper (Daviess County, KY), and Dr. Gail Cawkwell, MD, PhD (Chief Medical Officer, Purdue Pharma). 

 

FIRST RESPONDER, LAST CHANCE? WEBINAR

Original air date: April 13, 2017

Drug overdose is the leading cause of accidental death in the US, surpassing traffic fatalities. Opioid use is driving this epidemic. Awareness of prescription abuse and misuse has resulted in people turning to heroin. Heroin is being mixed with ultra potent chemicals and more people are accidentally overdosing and dying.

Opioids have a long history of medicinal and recreational use. They take away pain and activate pleasure sensors in the brain. Too much of an opiate can stop a person's breathing. Naloxone is an opiate receptor blocker that can restore a person's ability to breathe.

It can be administered intranasal and can save a person's life. Naloxone is a safe medication that an officer can administer with training.

In this webinar, learn how the benefits of an opioid reversal program go beyond just a life-saving intervention and truly embody law enforcement's motto “to protect and to serve”.

Presenter: Christopher Cicuto, Clinical Staff Pharmacist, Drug Information Center, Diamond Pharmacy, Indiana, PA

View Recording.

Source: https://www.sheriffs.org/programs/opioid-epidemic

Device could automatically deliver drug to reverse opioid overdose

Video: Opioid overdose
Purdue researchers are developing a wearable device that would automatically deliver an antidote upon detecting opioid overdose, buying time for emergency services to arrive.

(Purdue University image/Jongcheon Lim) Download image

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Opioid users tend to be alone and incapacitated during an overdose.

Purdue University researchers are developing a device that would automatically detect an overdose and deliver naloxone, a drug known to reverse deadly effects.

“The antidote is always going to be with you,” said Hyowon “Hugh” Lee, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Purdue. “The device wouldn’t require you to recognize that you’re having an overdose or to inject yourself with naloxone, keeping you stable long enough for emergency services to arrive.”

Overdose happens when opioids bind to receptors in the brain that regulate breathing, causing a person to hypoventilate and die. According the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, approximately 130 people in the U.S. die every day from opioid-related drug overdoses.

Lee’s team has built a wearable device designed to detect when a person’s respiration rate decreases to a certain level – converted from electrocardiography (EKG) signals – and then release naloxone, which blocks the opioid from binding to brain receptors.

Wearing the device would be similar to wearing an insulin pump: The current proof of concept is an armband that straps on a magnetic field generator, connected to a portable battery worn at the hip.

A sticker- EKG sensor on the skin, such as on the chest, measures respiration rate.

When the sensor detects a respiration rate that’s too low, it activates the magnetic field generator to heat up a drug capsule in the body, releasing naloxone in 10 seconds.

The researchers envision the drug capsule being pre-injected under the skin in an outpatient setting. That way, the device system would automatically deliver naloxone to the patient during an overdose, buying about an hour before relapsing. A video is available at https://youtu.be/b2Bfc4YRm0Y.

According to Lee, that extra hour would give emergency services plenty of time to get the patient to the hospital. The capsule also delivers a larger dose of naloxone than products currently available on the market – making it more effective at delaying relapse – and would be cheaper to manufacture.

Although the device doesn’t yet work automatically, the researchers demonstrated through in vitro and in vivo experiments that the setup successfully detects a low respiration rate from EKG signals and delivers naloxone. Their work appears in the Journal of Controlled Release.

The device has been patented through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization. Since submitting the work for publication, the researchers have downsized the magnetic field generator and battery so that the device is less bulky.

“The goal is to make the whole system unobtrusive, so that you don’t feel you’re having to wear something large all the time,” Lee said.

The researchers also plan to build a communications system into the device that would automatically alert emergency services when the patient has overdosed.

The technology could possibly deliver other drugs besides naloxone.

“People with allergies need epinephrine right away. This setup might remove the need for an epi pen,” Lee said.

Lee’s team built the device in collaboration with Purdue biomedical engineering professors Jacqueline Linnes, Chi Hwan Lee and Craig Goergen. This work was supported by an administrative supplement to a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (5U01DA038886-02) and a fellowship by the National Science Foundation (DGE-1333468).

The research aligns with Purdue's Giant Leaps celebration, acknowledging the university’s global advancements made in health, longevity and quality of life as part of Purdue’s 150th anniversary. This is one of the four themes of the yearlong celebration’s Ideas Festival, designed to showcase Purdue as an intellectual center solving real-world issues.

Writer: Kayla Wiles, 765-494-2432, wiles5@purdue.edu

Source: Hyowon “Hugh” Lee, 765-496-2444, hwlee@purdue.edu

Note to Journalists: For a copy of the paper, please contact Kayla Wiles, Purdue News Service, at wiles5@purdue.edu. A video is available at https://youtu.

be/b2Bfc4YRm0Y and other multimedia can be found in a Google Drive folder at http://bit.ly/opioid-media.

The materials were prepared by Erin Easterling, digital producer for the Purdue College of Engineering, 765-496-3388, easterling@purdue.edu. 

 ABSTRACT

Simple Minimally-Invasive Automatic Antidote Delivery Device (A2D2) towards Closed-Loop Reversal of Opioid Overdose

Bahar Dhowan, Jongcheon Lim, Michael D. MacLean, Alycia G.Berman, Min Ku Kim, Qi Yang, Jacqueline Linnes, Chi Hwan Lee, Craig J. Goergen, Hyowon Lee

Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2019.05.041

With approximately 48,000 attributed deaths in 2017, the opioid overdose is now the leading cause of death amongst Americans under the age of 50.

The overdose process can be interrupted by the administration of naloxone, a safe and effective opiate antagonist that can reverse the effects of overdose and minimizing the delay in administering the antidote is critical in preventing permanent damage to patients.

A closed-loop implantable drug delivery system is an ideal solution to minimize the response time, however, they often feature complex designs that are expensive to fabricate and require a more invasive surgical implantation.

Here we propose a simple, low-cost, minimally-invasive automatic antidote delivery device (A2D2) that can administer a large dose of naloxone upon detection of overdose-induced respiratory failure. The subcutaneously placed device can be activated using an externally applied time varying magnetic field from a wearable device.

Using a custom magnetic field generator, we were able to release the drug within 10 s. Our bench-top evaluation showed that A2D2 can release 1.9 mg of powdered drug within 60 s and up to 8.8 mg in 600 s. We also performed in vivo evaluation to demonstrate rapid drug releasing capability in the subcutaneous space of mice.

However, we saw a small amount of leakage (1.75% of payload) over the course of 1000 h of simulated implantation. Thus, additional research is needed to verify the long term stability of our device and to demonstrate the closed-loop release mechanism to revive overdosed animals. Nevertheless, our preliminary results show the potential of using a simple, low-cost, subcutaneous device for emergency drug delivery application.

Source: https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2019/Q3/device-could-automatically-deliver-drug-to-reverse-opioid-overdose.html

Opioid Overdose

Video: Opioid overdose

Next

As the opioid epidemic rages on and grows, learning how to treat for opioid overdose becomes even more important. And that's the focus of this lesson – learning how to assess for, and provide treatment for, opioid/opiate overdose.

Opioids are central nervous system depressants. The central nervous system is responsible for controlling every organ, system, and function in the human body, including both the respiratory system and the cardiovascular system.

When the central nervous system becomes depressed too much, these organs, systems, and functions will begin to slow down and eventually cease to operate.

Who is at Risk of an Opioid Overdose?

While you're right to think that addicts and illegal drug users are most at risk, the truth is that anyone who takes an opiate or opioid is at risk of overdosing, particularly when:

  • An amount is taken beyond the prescribed dose
  • It's taken in combination with other central nervous system depressants, alcohol
  • The patient has an unknown medical condition that creates a hypersensitivity to opioids

Common opiates/opioids include:

  • Heroine
  • Morphine
  • Codeine
  • Methadone
  • Hydrocodone (brand names: Vicodin, Lortab)
  • Oxycodone (brand name: Percocet)

There are some commonly used drugs that can cause signs and symptoms similar to an opioid overdose, including:

  • Cocaine
  • LSD
  • Ecstasy
  • Tranquilizers
  • Marijuana

Pro Tip #1: While the standard and immediate treatment for opioid overdose (spoiler alert: Naloxone) works well to reverse the condition and revive the patient, if their problem is one related to another substance, those in the list above, naloxone will have zero effect.

How to Provide Care

As always, the first thing you want to do is make sure the scene is safe and that your gloves are on. Make sure you have your rescue mask with a one-way valve handy and begin calling out to the victim to assess whether or not he or she is responsive.

Are you OK? Can you hear me?

If the patient is unconscious, you'll want to assess for normal breathing and determine if the patient has a pulse. As you know by now, the presence of a pulse but not normal breathing means you'll go right into rescue breathing. While the absence of both means you'll perform full CPR.

While it may not always be possible to be certain of an opiate/opioid overdose, there are some signs to point in that direction, including:

  • Drugs or empty drug packages near the victim
  • Very slow respiration
  • Pinpoint pupils

Treatment for Opioid Overdose

For patients with known or suspected opiate/opioid addiction issues, the immediate course of treatment is administering naloxone, either by intramuscular injection or intranasal mist. Of course, make sure administering naloxone is allowed per your organization's regulations and protocols.

Pro Tip #2: The recommended dose of naloxone is 2mg for the rapid reversal of overdose symptoms when respiratory distress is present.

The benefit of using a nasal atomizer is that it will administer the naloxone in a readily available form, a fine mist which the patient can quickly absorb. To administer naloxone via the nasal atomizer, proceed with the following steps:

  1. Assemble the nasal atomizer per the instructions.
  2. Tilt the patient's head back slightly.
  3. Position the nasal atomizer into one nostril and briskly spray half of the amount (approximately 1cc).
  4. Position the nasal atomizer into the other nostril and spray the remaining naloxone.
  5. Wait 3-5 minutes.

Continue to perform rescue breathing or CPR while waiting for the naloxone to take effect. If there isn't any change in the patient after 3-5 minutes, administer a second dose of naloxone.

If a second dose doesn't revive the patient, something else is ly wrong. Either there aren't any opiates in the patient's system. Or they're unusually strong or plentiful and will require more naloxone.

A Word About the Signs and Symptoms of Substance Abuse and Misuse

Many of the signs and symptoms of substance abuse and misuse are similar to those of other medical emergencies. Which means you cannot necessarily assume that individuals who are stumbling, disoriented, or have a fruity, alcohol- odor on the breath are intoxicated by alcohol or other drugs, as this may also be a sign of a diabetic emergency.

As in other medical emergencies, you don't have to be certain of your diagnosis for substance abuse or misuse to provide care. It can be helpful, however, if you notice certain clues that suggest what the problem really is. Such clues will also help you provide as much complete information to advanced medical personnel so that they can continue providing prompt and appropriate care.

Often these clues will come from the patient, bystanders, or the scene itself. As mentioned earlier, look for containers, pill bottles, drug paraphernalia, and signs of other medical problems. If the patient is incoherent or unconscious, try to get information from any bystanders or family members.

Since many of the physical signs of substance abuse mimic other conditions, you may not be able to determine that a patient has overdosed. To provide care, you only need to recognize abnormalities in breathing, skin color and moisture, body temperature, and behavior, any of which may indicate a condition requiring professional help.

Source: https://www.procpr.org/training_video/opioid-overdose

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