Dietary vitamins may protect against cataract

Healthy Vitamin C Amount Might Prevent Cataracts

Dietary vitamins may protect against cataract

From the WebMD Archives

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) — While many believe that vitamin C helps ward off colds, a new study suggests the nutrient might prevent something more serious — cataracts.

“While we cannot totally avoid developing cataracts, we may be able to delay their onset and keep them from worsening significantly by eating a diet rich in vitamin C,” study lead researcher Dr. Christopher Hammond said in a news release from the journal Ophthalmology.

The study was published online in the journal March 23.

As the researchers described, cataracts occur naturally with age and cause the eye's lens to become cloudy. Cataracts can be removed but they remain the leading cause of blindness worldwide.

The new study included more than 1,000 pairs of 60-year-old British female twins. The researchers found that those who took in high amounts of vitamin C in their diet had a one-third lower risk of cataract over 10 years.

Getting vitamin C via a supplement did not appear to reduce the risk, the investigators found.

The study is the first to show that diet and lifestyle may play a more important role than genetics in cataract development and severity, according to the researchers.

the findings, Hammond's team now believes that a person's genetics probably account for 35 percent of the risk of cataract progression, while diet and other environmental factors may account for the other 65 percent.

However, it's important to note that this study can only show associations; it cannot prove a cause-and-effect relationship between dietary vitamin C and cataracts.

“The most important finding was that vitamin C intake from food seemed to protect against cataract progression,” said Hammond, who is professor of ophthalmology at Kings College London.

Vitamin C's strength as an antioxidant may explain how it reduces the risk of cataract progression, his team explained. The fluid inside the eye is normally high in vitamin C, which helps prevent oxidation that leads to clouding of the eye lens. A vitamin C-rich diet may boost the amount of the vitamin in the eye fluid, providing extra protection against cataract.

Dr. Mark Fromer is an ophthalmologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. He said that “the finding that vitamin C intake can retard cataract formation is a new finding that changes the way we think of cataract formation.”

Now, doctors have a new understanding that “diet clearly is important in slowing the progression of cataracts, the most blinding form of eye disease worldwide,” Fromer said.

Another expert agreed.

“This is a well-designed, prospective study that confirms what ophthalmologists have always suspected — that a well-balanced diet that includes foods that give us a boost of antioxidants is critical to preventing damage and the aging of our eyes,” said Dr. Carolyn Shih, director of research in ophthalmology at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y.

“As we approach the spring and summer, eating foods high in vitamin C — such as kale, broccoli, papaya, citrus fruits and strawberries — is as essential as using sunglasses to prevent cataracts as we age,” she added.

SOURCES: Mark Fromer, M.D., ophthalmologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Carolyn Shih, M.D., M.P.H., director of research, department of ophthalmology, Northwell Health, Great Neck, N.Y.; Ophthalmology, news release, March 23, 2016

Copyright © 2013-2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/eye-health/cataracts/news/20160324/healthy-amount-of-vitamin-c-might-keep-cataracts-at-bay

Dietary Vitamin C Appears to Slow Development of Cataract

Dietary vitamins may protect against cataract
A diet rich in vitamin C helps slow the progression of cataracts, suggests a new study published online in Ophthalmology. The research also shows for the first time that diet and lifestyle may play a greater role than genetics in cataract development and severity.

Researchers at King’s College London looked at whether certain nutrients from food or supplements could affect the development of cataract. They also tried to find out how much environmental factors such as diet mattered as compared to genetics.The team examined data from more than 1,000 pairs of female twins from the United Kingdom.

Participants answered a food questionnaire to track the intake of vitamin C and other nutrients, including vitamins A, B, D, E, copper, manganese and zinc. To measure the progression of cataracts, digital imaging was used to check the opacity of their lenses at around age 60.

The second measurement took place on average 10 or so years later but was only performed on 324 pairs of twins.Both vitamin C and manganese were associated with a 20-percent risk reduction for cataract at baseline. After 10 years, the amount of lens opacity increased in all subjects, as expected.

But researchers found that women who reported consuming more vitamin C from foods had a 33-percent risk reduction of cataract progression. Genetic factors accounted for 35 percent of the difference in cataract progression. Environmental factors, such as diet, accounted for 65 percent.

These results suggest genetic factors may be less important in the progression of cataracts than previously thought. Not enough data was available on the various vitamin supplements consumed to adequately study their individual effects.How dietary vitamin C inhibits cataract progression may have do with its strength as an antioxidant.

The fluid inside the eye is normally high in vitamin C, which helps prevents oxidation that clouds the lens. More vitamin C in the diet may increase the amount present in the fluid around the lens, providing extra protection.

 “The most important finding was that vitamin C intake from food seemed to protect against cataract progression,” said study author Christopher Hammond, MD, FRCOphth, professor of ophthalmology at King’s College London.

“While we cannot totally avoid developing cataracts, we may be able to delay their onset and keep them from worsening significantly by eating a diet rich in vitamin C.

IUPUI Researchers Use Stem Cells to Identify Cellular Processes Related to Glaucoma
   Using stem cells derived from human skin cells, researchers led by Jason Meyer, PhD, assistant professor of biology, along with graduate student Sarah Ohlemacher of the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, have successfully demonstrated the ability to turn stem cells into retinal ganglion cells, the neurons that conduct visual information from the eye to the brain. Their goal is the development of therapies to prevent or cure glaucoma.     In addition to glaucoma, this work has potential implications for treatment of optic-nerve injuries of the types incurred by soldiers in combat or athletes in contact sports.    In the study, which appears online in advance of publication in the journal Stem Cells, the IUPUI investigators took skin cells biopsied from volunteers with an inherited form of glaucoma and from volunteers without the disease and genetically reprogrammed them to become pluripotent stem cells, meaning they are able to differentiate into any cell type in the body. The researchers then directed the stem cells to become RGCs, at which point the cells began adopting features specific to RGCs—features that were different in the cells of individuals with glaucoma than in the cells that came from healthy individuals.    Glaucoma is the most common disease that affects RGCs. When these cells are damaged or severed, the brain cannot receive critical information, leading to blindness. The National Institutes of Health’s National Eye Institute estimates that glaucoma affects more than 2.7 million people in the United States and more than 60 million worldwide.    “Skin cells from individuals with glaucoma are no different from skin cells of those without glaucoma,” said Dr. Meyer, a cell biologist and stem cell researcher, who also holds an appointment as a primary investigator with the Stark Neurosciences Research Institute at the Indiana University School of Medicine. “However, when we turned glaucoma patients’ skin cells into stem cells and then into RGCs, the cells became unhealthy and started dying off at a much faster rate than those of healthy individuals.    “Now that we have produced cells that develop features of glaucoma in culture dishes, we want to see if compounds we add to these RGCs can slow down the degeneration process or prevent these cells from dying off. We already have found candidates that look promising and are studying them. In the more distant future, we may be able to use healthy patient cells as substitute cells as we learn how to replace cells lost to the disease. It’s a significant challenge, but it’s the ultimate—and, we think, not unrealistic—long-range goal.”    For a further update on stem cell research, see p. 26.

Aerie Presents Rhopressa Safety Update
Aerie Pharmaceuticals reported an update including further details on the safety profile for Rhopressa QD, a novel once-daily eye drop being tested for its ability to lower intraocular pressure in patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension. The company previously reported interim topline 12-month safety and efficacy data on Feb. 17, 2016, for Aerie’s second Phase III registration trial for Rhopressa QD, indicating that  the drug had a positive safety profile with sustained efficacy through the 12-month period. The company expects to submit the NDA for Rhopressa QD in the third quarter of 2016. Among the safety update highlights:• Detailed 90-day safety data from Rocket 1 and Rocket 2 for Rhopressa QD were shared with the Food and Drug Administration during the pre-NDA meeting that was held in October 2015.• the Rhopressa QD safety and efficacy data reviewed by the company to date, and in consideration of the adverse event and efficacy profiles of other products currently in the market, the company believes that product candidate Rhopressa QD continues to have significant potential.• Patients with contraindications to timolol, or beta blockers in general, or otherwise presenting with cardiopulmonary issues, were excluded from both Rocket 1 and Rocket 2. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention data from 2011 and 2014, an estimated 47 percent of the U.S. population older than 65 years of age has heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, all of which are contraindications to timolol.• Since it is not systemically absorbed, Rhopressa QD has not shown any drug-related systemic effects, nor has it generated any serious adverse events. Every other product in the adjunctive market for glaucoma and ocular hypertension has a history of drug-related systemic effects. Rhopressa is being positioned to compete in the adjunctive market, which represents approximately half of the prescription volume for glaucoma products in the United States.• The most prevalent adverse event for Rhopressa QD was conjunctival hyperemia, the large majority of which was considered mild. Fifty percent of Rhopressa QD patients experienced hyperemia at some point during  the trial; however, only 10 percent of the patients in the trial had hyperemia at each visit over the 12-month trial period.• Other adverse events, including corneal deposits, conjunctival hemorrhages, blurry vision and reduced visual acuity, all of which have been observed in safety data for other marketed products, were commonly sporadic or self-resolving for the 118 patients on Rhopressa QD for the 12-month period in Rocket 2.

Slides posted to the Aerie website (aeriepharma.com) include an in-depth analysis, including images where applicable, of the Rhopressa QD adverse events noted in the safety data.


Drug Repurposed To Treat Pterygium

At the Israeli Society for Vision and Eye Research conference on March 10, the MedInsight Research Institute and Center for Drug Repurposing at Ariel University presented the latest findings on positive user-reported outcomes of the repurposed drug dipyridamole in treating pterygium and related dry-eye symptoms. Dipyridamole is a cardiovascular drug, used for the past 55 years for treating angina and preventing stroke. It also has wide applicability for eye disorders, having been researched for various eye ailments over the past four decades, including diabetic retinopathy, ocular hypertension and retinal hemorrhage. In 2014, MedInsight published the first case report of a pterygium patient being successfully treated with dipyridamole eye drops. In the findings presented at ISVER, researchers analyzed outcomes of dry-eye symptoms reported by patients with pterygium. Using the Ocular Surface Disease Index, the researchers found that there was a maximum reduction in OSDI scores averaging 52.4 percent during the course of treatment for 25 patients. Some patients reported a complete resolution of symptoms. Photographic evidence showed marked antiangiogenic effects and regression of the pterygia.“These results are very exciting,” said Moshe Rogosnitzky, director of the Center for Drug Repurposing, who discovered this novel treatment. “Until now, the only known treatment for pterygium has been surgical removal, which involves a high recurrence rate. In addition, patients are often given topical steroids to treat their symptoms, but this can result in glaucoma. Now we have a promising potential treatment for this very difficult-to-treat disorder, and it appears to be not only effective, but entails only a small amount of a very safe medicine. This treatment possibility offers very distinct advantages over the existing treatment offered.” Aaron Frenkel, research coordinator for MedInsight, added that studies are currently being planned at medical centers in Israel, Europe, Turkey and India. “This drug does not yet have commercial sponsorship, so studies are taking longer to initiate since research funds are dependent on donors. We are hopeful that clinical trials will begin later this year,” said Mr. Frenkel.

Patents Issued for Micropulse Laser

Iridex Corp. announced two new patent approvals covering key elements of its MicroPulse technology and improving the delivery of its subthreshold treatment for patients with glaucoma and retinal diseases. The patents relate to the company’s TxCell Scanning Laser Delivery System, which is a platform that allows MicroPulse laser therapy to be planned and delivered in a grid pattern, allowing the procedure to be completed with greater efficiency and confidence than older “singlespot” delivery strategies. Expanding on the core MicroPulse technology, these new patents cover automatic laser delivery with multispot pattern scanning for efficient retinal photocoagulation that is tissue-sparing and enables faster treatment procedures.  Show more on: NEWS AND EVENTS

Source: https://www.reviewofophthalmology.com/article/dietary-vitamin-c-appears-to-slow-development-of-cataract

Nutrition and Cataracts

Dietary vitamins may protect against cataract

Cataracts are a leading cause of visual impairment among aging Americans and a key quality-of-life issue. Cataract removal is the most common surgical procedure performed in the U.S.

, accounting for more than 2 million procedures each year.

Experts theorize that if the progression of cataracts could be delayed by 10 years, annual cataract surgeries would decrease by 45 percent.

Nutrition is one promising way to prevent or delay the progression of cataracts.

Cataracts

Cataracts develop when the proteins in the lens of the eye are damaged, causing them to become translucent or opaque. There are three major types of cataracts, depending on where they are located in the lens: nuclear, cortical and posterior subcapsular.

Several uncontrollable factors may increase the risk of developing cataracts, including:

  • Age
  • Family history
  • Ethnicity (African Americans have a higher risk of developing and becoming blind from cataracts.)
  • Some studies also suggest that women may be at a slightly higher risk than men.

However, research shows we can control several risk factors for cataracts by changing certain behaviors, including:

  • Not smoking
  • Reducing exposure to sunlight by wearing UVA/UVB protective eyewear and wide-brimmed hats
  • Controlling other diseases such as diabetes
  • Eating a healthy diet

Several research studies show that the antioxidant properties of vitamins C and E may protect against the development and progression of cataracts. Early evidence also suggests that the carotenoids lutein (pronounced loo-teen) and zeaxanthin (pronounced zee-uh-zan-thin), which are also antioxidants, may also help protect against cataracts.

Research on antioxidant vitamins

Some recent studies have shown that antioxidants vitamins C and E may decrease the development or progression of cataracts:

  • The Nutrition and Vision Project found that higher intakes of vitamin C reduced the risk for cortical and nuclear cataracts. Results also showed that people who used vitamin C and E supplements for more than 10 years decreased the progression of nuclear cataracts.
  • A recent analysis of results from a national dietary study (Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) found that higher levels of vitamin C in the diet were associated with a lower risk of cataracts.
  • In the Nurses' Health Study, cataract surgery was lower among women who took vitamin C supplements for 10 years or longer.
  • The Roche European American Cataract Trial found that taking an antioxidant supplement with vitamins C and E and beta-carotene led to a small decrease in the progression of cataracts in less than three years.
  • In the Longitudinal Study of Cataract, taking a vitamin E supplement for at least a year was associated with a reduced risk of nuclear cataracts becoming more severe.
  • The five-year follow-up to the Beaver Dam Eye Study showed that people using multivitamins or any supplement containing vitamins C and E had a reduced risk for nuclear and cortical cataracts.

Research – Lutein and Zeaxanthin

Lutein and zeaxanthin are promising nutrients in the fight against cataracts. Lutein and zeaxanthin are the only carotenoids found in the eye. Several recent studies have examined these two nutrients and the risk of developing cataracts:

  • The Nurses' Health Study found that people taking high amounts of lutein+zeaxanthin had a reduced need for cataract surgery. On average, people took around 6 milligrams (mg) of lutein+zeaxanthin each day.
  • The Health Professional's Follow-Up Study also found that eating foods with high amounts of lutein+zeaxanthin (6.9 mg per day) led to a reduced need for cataract surgery.
  • The five-year follow-up to the Beaver Dam Eye Study showed that people with the highest intakes of lutein+zeaxanthin had a significantly lower risk for developing new cataracts than those with the lowest intakes.
  • A recent study in England found that people with the highest amount of lutein in their blood, from regularly eating food high in lutein, had the lowest risk for posterior subcapsular cataracts.

What You Need to Know

Given the positive association between nutrition and cataracts, it's probably a good idea to increase the amount of certain antioxidants in your daily diet. Eating five servings of fruits and vegetables each day, as currently recommended by the National Cancer Institute and U.S.

Department of Agriculture, can provide more than 100 mg of vitamin C and 5 to 6 mg of carotenoids, including lutein and zeaxanthin. Eating two servings of nuts and seeds can provide 8 to 14 mg of vitamin E. See the tables below for good food sources of these nutrients.

However, the majority of people in the U.S.

are not eating five servings of fruits and vegetables and good food sources of vitamin E each day. The average daily diet contains approximately 100 mg of vitamin C, 1 to 7 mg lutein and zeaxanthin, and 8 mg vitamin E. In the studies mentioned here, the consumption levels associated with cataract benefits were considerably higher than the current average intake.

If you find it difficult to increase the level of these antioxidants and carotenoids in your diet, consider taking multivitamin/mineral and eye health supplements containing these nutrients.

Nutrient Values Tested

Nutrient Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA)1,2 Levels Associated with Health Benefit Percent of People Getting Less than 100% of RDA1,2,3,4
Vitamin C 90 mg for men75 mg for women+35 mg for smokers ≥ 250 mg More than 50% of individuals
Vitamin E* 22 IU (15 mg) natural33 IU (30 mg) synthetic ≥ 100 IU More than 90% of individuals
Lutein and Zeaxanthin** 6 mg Average intakeper day 1.7 mg

* The Food and Nutrition Board reported two different RDA values for vitamin E depending on synthetic or natural source.
** There is no RDA for lutein, zeaxanthin and beta-carotene. 1. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E and Carotenoids.

Institute of Medicine, 2000.2. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A and Zinc. Institute of Medicine, 2001.3. Vitamin and mineral data were obtained from CSFII, 1994-1996. Values correspond to all individuals.

4.

Carotenoid data was gathered from NHANES III, 1988-1994.

Food Sources

Most fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of vitamin C. Oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, papaya, green peppers and tomatoes are particularly high in vitamin C.Vitamin E is more difficult to obtain from food sources alone since it is found in very small quantities in foods.

Good food sources include vegetable oils (including safflower and corn oil), almonds, pecans, wheat germ and sunflower seeds.

Lutein and zeaxanthin are found together in many food sources.

Dark green leafy vegetables are the primary source of lutein and zeaxanthin, but lesser amounts are in other colorful fruits and vegetables, such as broccoli, orange peppers, corn, peas, persimmons and tangerines.

Good Food Sources of Vitamin E (mg/serving)

Food Amount Vitamin E
Almonds 1/4 cup 9.3 (13.9 IU)
Sunflower seeds 1/4 cup 5.8 (8.7 IU)
Safflower oil 1 tbsp 4.7 (7.0 IU)
Peanuts 1/4 cup 3.3 (4.9 IU)
Peanut butter 2 tbsp 3.2 (4.8 IU)
Corn oil 1 tbsp 2.8 (4.2 IU)

Source: USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 13

Good Food Sources of Vitamin C (mg/serving)

Food Amount Vitamin C
Orange juice, fresh squeezed 1 cup 124
Grapefruit juice, fresh squeezed 1 cup 94
Papaya 1/2 medium 94
Cantaloupe 1/4 melon 86
Orange 1 medium 80
Green peppers, raw chopped 1/2 cup 67
Tomato juice 1 cup 44
Strawberries 1/2 cup 43
Broccoli, raw chopped 1/2 cup 41
Grapefruit 1/2 medium 40

Source: USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 13

Good Food Sources of Lutein and Zeaxanthin (mg/serving)

Food/Serving(1 cup) Lutein and Zeaxanthin Lutein Zeaxanthin
Kale 20.5 – 26.5* 1.1 – 2.2*
Collard greens 15.3 5.1
Spinach 3.6 – 12.6* 1.7 – 13.3* 0.5 – 5.9*
Turnip greens 12.1 0.4
Broccoli 2.1 – 3.5* 1.4 – 1.6*
Corn, yellow 1.4 – 3.0 0.6 0.9
Peas, green 2.3 2.2
Orange pepper 1.7
Persimmons 1.4 0.8
Tangerine 0.5 0.2

*depending on variety and preparation

Source: USDA-NCC Carotenoid Database, 1998USDA Food Nutrient Database for Standard Release 13Hart and Scott, 1995

Source: https://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/caring-for-your-vision/nutrition/nutrition-and-cataracts

This vitamin could help protect your eyes against cataracts

Dietary vitamins may protect against cataract

While many believe that vitamin C helps ward off colds, a new study suggests the nutrient might prevent something more serious — cataracts.

“While we cannot totally avoid developing cataracts, we may be able to delay their onset and keep them from worsening significantly by eating a diet rich in vitamin C,” study lead researcher Dr. Christopher Hammond said in a news release from the journal Ophthalmology.

The study was published online in the journal March 23.

As the researchers described, cataracts occur naturally with age and cause the eye's lens to become cloudy. Cataracts can be removed but they remain the leading cause of blindness worldwide.

Feast your eyes: 8 nutrients to help protect your sight

The new study included more than 1,000 pairs of 60-year-old British female twins. The researchers found that those who took in high amounts of vitamin C in their diet had a one-third lower risk of cataract over 10 years.

Getting vitamin C via a supplement did not appear to reduce the risk, the investigators found.

The study is the first to show that diet and lifestyle may play a more important role than genetics in cataract development and severity, according to the researchers.

the findings, Hammond's team now believes that a person's genetics probably account for 35 percent of the risk of cataract progression, while diet and other environmental factors may account for the other 65 percent.

However, it's important to note that this study can only show associations; it cannot prove a cause-and-effect relationship between dietary vitamin C and cataracts.

“The most important finding was that vitamin C intake from food seemed to protect against cataract progression,” said Hammond, who is professor of ophthalmology at Kings College London.

Vitamin C's strength as an antioxidant may explain how it reduces the risk of cataract progression, his team explained. The fluid inside the eye is normally high in vitamin C, which helps prevent oxidation that leads to clouding of the eye lens. A vitamin C-rich diet may boost the amount of the vitamin in the eye fluid, providing extra protection against cataract.

  • What your eyes can reveal about your health

Dr. Mark Fromer is an ophthalmologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. He said that “the finding that vitamin C intake can retard cataract formation is a new finding that changes the way we think of cataract formation.”

Now, doctors have a new understanding that “diet clearly is important in slowing the progression of cataracts, the most blinding form of eye disease worldwide,” Fromer said.

Another expert agreed.

“This is a well-designed, prospective study that confirms what ophthalmologists have always suspected — that a well-balanced diet that includes foods that give us a boost of antioxidants is critical to preventing damage and the aging of our eyes,” said Dr. Carolyn Shih, director of research in ophthalmology at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y.

“As we approach the spring and summer, eating foods high in vitamin C — such as kale, broccoli, papaya, citrus fruits and strawberries — is as essential as using sunglasses to prevent cataracts as we age,” she added.

First published on March 25, 2016 / 12:03 PM

© 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Source: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/vitamin-c-may-help-protect-against-cataracts/

5 Top Foods for Eye Health

Dietary vitamins may protect against cataract

ColorBlind Images/Blend Images/Thinkstock

Do your eyes have all the nutrients they need to help prevent cataracts, macular degeneration, glaucoma and other sight woes? Read on to learn about some of the top foods for eye health.

But don't count on popping a pill to get these nutrients — your best sources of vitamins and antioxidants are from whole foods, since it may be a food's combination of nutrients that have a synergistic effect.

Kale: See the Light

This leafy green is a rich source of lutein and zeaxanthin, which are related to vitamin A and beta carotene, and may help protect eye tissues from sunlight damage and reduce the risk of eye changes related to aging.

Other good sources of these nutrients include dark green leafy vegetables such as collard greens, turnip greens and spinach, broccoli, peas, kiwi, red grapes, yellow squash, oranges, corn, mangoes and honeydew melon.

Your body needs fat to absorb lutein and zeaxanthin, so be sure to eat them with a bit of healthy fat such as a drizzle of olive oil or a few slices of avocado. And kale isn't just a one-note food — it contains vitamin C and beta carotene, other eye-friendly nutrients.

Sweet Potatoes: The Color of Health

These orange tubers are a good source of beta carotene. Your body converts beta carotene to vitamin A, a nutrient that helps prevent dry eyes and night blindness. Beta carotene and vitamin A also may help reduce the risk eye infections.

Sweet potatoes not your favorite? For beta carotene, try other deep orange foods, such as carrots and butternut squash, plus dark green foods including spinach and collard greens. Liver, milk and eggs are other great sources of vitamin A.

And, similar to lutein and zeaxanthin, beta carotene and vitamin A are absorbed best when eaten with a little healthy fat such as olive oil.

Strawberries: Help You “C” Better

Fresh, juicy strawberries are a good thing for your eyes, and contain plenty of vitamin C, which is an antioxidant that may help lower your risk of cataracts. Also, be sure to load up your plate with other vitamin C-rich foods including bell peppers, broccoli, citrus (such as orange and grapefruit) and cantaloupe.

Salmon: Not Just Omega-3s

Salmon is a good source of vitamin D, which may help protect against macular degeneration. You also can get vitamin D by enjoying sardines, mackerel, milk and orange juice fortified with vitamin D.

In addition, salmon is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, which may be beneficial for eye health.

Get some healthy fats every day in the form of salmon or other types of fish (two to three times per week), walnuts (which also contain eye-healthy vitamin E), flax and chia seeds. 

Green Tea: Antioxidant Powerhouse

A cup of green tea is more than relaxing and delicious — its antioxidants may help keep eyes healthy. Green tea contains healthful substances called catechins, which are responsible for its antioxidant properties. Other foods that are that are high in catechins include red wine, chocolate, berries and apples. Black tea also boasts catechins, but in lower amounts than its green cousin.

Source: https://www.eatright.org/health/wellness/preventing-illness/5-top-foods-for-eye-health

Healthy tears: Vitamin C may protect against cataracts

Dietary vitamins may protect against cataract

Cataract surgery is the most common operation performed in the UK with more than 300,000 procedures carried out each year.

There was an estimated cataract rate of 19.3% in European adults in 2007. This prevalence increases with age from 5% for those aged 52–62​​, 30% for those aged 60–69 and 64% for over 70s​.

The study led by King’s College London looked at the progression of cataracts in 324 pairs of female twins over ten years.

Photographs were examined of the participant’s lenses showing the opacity of the lens in detail. Participant intake of vitamin C was also measured using a food questionnaire.

Participants with high levels of dietary vitamin C had a 33% reduced risk of cataract progression and ‘clearer’ lenses after ten years than those who had consumed less dietary vitamin C.

“The findings of this study could have significant impact, particularly for the ageing population globally by suggesting that simple dietary changes such as increased intake of fruit and vegetables as part of a healthier diet could help protect them from cataracts,”​ said Professor Chris Hammond, consultant eye surgeon and lead author of the study from the Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences at the university.

“While we cannot avoid getting older, diabetes and smoking are also risk factors for this type of cataract, and so a healthy balanced diet and lifestyle generally should reduce the risk of needing a cataract operation.”​

Vitamin C tears 

The study’s authors believed that eye fluid that bathed the lens is high in vitamin C. This helps to stop the lens becoming cloudy.

They suggested increased vitamin C intake exerted a preventative effect on cataract progression by increasing the vitamin C available in this fluid.

“The human body cannot manufacture vitamin C, so we depend on vitamins in the food we eat,”​ said Kate Yonova-Doing, the study’s first author.

“We did not find a significantly reduced risk in people who took vitamin tablets, so it seems that a healthy diet is better than supplements.”​

Conflicting studies

Sources of vitamin C include fruits such as oranges. (© iStock.com/Gladkikh)

Studies​​ on the effect of dietary vitamin C intake, serum vitamin C concentrations​​, and vitamin C supplementation​​ on nuclear cataract formation have given conflicting results in the past.

Similarly, dietary and supplemented vitamin E intake and vitamin E blood concentrations have been shown to be related inversely with nuclear cataract.

Meanwhile vitamin A has been associated with a reduced risk of nuclear cataract, as have lutein and zeaxanthin.

Landmark studies

Two landmark studies into vitamin C intake and cataract formation highlighted its protective effects. (© iStock.com)

The results of this latest study are similar to those of the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study​​, which showed vitamin C intake assessed with an food frequency questionnaire ten years before cataract assessment was protective against cataracts.

The Blue Mountains Eye Study​​ also found vitamin C intake, through both diet and supplements, resulted in a lower nuclear cataract incidence over ten years.

This study is the first to show that dietary vitamin C intake protects against progression of nuclear lens opacity.

Source: Ophthalmology​

Published online ahead of print, doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.01.036​

“Genetic and Dietary Factors Influencing the Progression of Nuclear Cataract.”​

Authors: E. Yonova-Doing, Z. A. Forkin, P. G. Hysi, K. M. Williams, T. D. Spector, C. E. Gilbert and C. J. Hammond

Source: https://www.nutraingredients.com/Article/2016/03/25/Healthy-tears-Vitamin-C-may-protect-against-cataracts

Vitamin C-Rich Foods May Reduce Cataract Risk

Dietary vitamins may protect against cataract

Getty Images

A diet of vitamin C-rich foods, such as citrus fruits and dark green vegetables, can help cut the risk of cataracts.

En español | Your risk of developing cataracts — a clouding of the eye’s lens that impairs vision— starts to climb at age 40. But a new study finds that a diet high in vitamin C–rich foods may cut that risk by a third.

Don’t try to take a shortcut by popping a vitamin C tablet: Supplements don’t have the same effect, British researchers found. Only foods naturally high in the antioxidant vitamin, including citrus fruits and dark green vegetables, seem to protect against cataracts.

“While we cannot totally avoid developing cataracts, we may be able to delay their onset and keep them from worsening significantly by eating a diet rich in vitamin C,” study lead author Christopher Hammond, M.D., a professor of ophthalmology at King’s College London, said in a statement. 

The study was published in March in the journal Ophthalmology. The research also showed that diet may play a more important role than genetics when it comes to cataracts.

Genetic factors accounted for 35 percent of the risk of cataracts worsening, while environmental factors, including diet, accounted for 65 percent, researchers reported.

In the study, scientists followed the progression of cataracts in 324 pairs of 60-year-old female twins from the United Kingdom over 10 years. The women’s intake of vitamin C was measured using a food questionnaire.

Those who ate more vitamin C–rich foods had a 33 percent lower risk of cataracts and clearer lenses after 10 years, compared with those who consumed less vitamin C.

Why is vitamin C so important? The fluid in the eye that bathes the lens is high in vitamin C, which helps stop the lens from oxidizing and protects it from becoming cloudy, researchers explained. The belief is that increased intake of vitamin C helps protect cataracts from progressing by increasing the amount of the vitamin in the eye fluid. Keep in mind, this study only found an association between vitamin C–rich diets and cataracts; it did not prove cause and effect.

Still, as Hammond noted, it suggests that “simple dietary changes, such as increased intake of fruits and vegetables, could help protect [older adults] from cataracts.”

According to the U.S.

National Eye Institute, more than 24 million Americans had cataracts in 2010, the latest data available; that is estimated to rise to 40 million by 2030. White Americans and women have the highest risk.

By age 80, the government estimates 70 percent of white Americans will have cataracts, compared with 53 percent of African Americans and 61 percent of Hispanics.

To add vitamin C–rich foods to your diet, think beyond oranges. The government-recommended daily amount of vitamin C is 60 milligrams (mg). An orange has about 70 mg. Here are some other foods with high C levels, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture:

  • Red bell pepper, ½ cup: 95 mg.
  • Orange juice, ¾ cup: 93 mg.
  • Kiwifruit, 1 medium: 64 mg.
  • Green bell pepper, ½ cup: 60 mg.
  • Strawberries, fresh, ½ cup: 49 mg.
  • Broccoli, cooked, ½ cup: 51 mg.
  • Kale, raw, ½ cup: 40 mg.
  • Broccoli, raw, ½ cup: 39 mg.
  • Cantaloupe, ½ cup: 29 mg.

Source: https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2016/foods-rich-in-vitamin-c-may-reduce-cataract-risk.html

Cataracts: Can vitamin supplements help maintain your vision?

Dietary vitamins may protect against cataract

Created: May 22, 2013; Last Update: October 10, 2019; Next update: 2022.

Dietary supplements containing beta-carotene, vitamin C or vitamin E can neither prevent age-related cataracts nor slow the progression of the condition.

Dietary supplements are often marketed using a lot of health-related claims. They are available over the counter in pharmacies, supermarkets, drugstores or on the internet.

They come in many different forms, including tablets, capsules, powder or liquids. Dietary supplements contain nutrients that also occur naturally in our food, such as vitamins and minerals, but in a concentrated form and often at a higher dose.

Some of these products are claimed to be especially good for your eyes and vision.

When cataracts develop, the lens of the eye gradually becomes cloudy. This causes your eyesight to become increasingly blurry, as if you were looking at things through a veil or fog. In industrialized countries, cataracts are more common in older people.

According to one popular theory, substances called free radicals develop in the cells of the eyes, where they may damage the tissue. Some vitamin supplements are believed to slow this damage, thereby supposedly preventing cataracts from developing, or slowing down vision loss.

Researchers from an international research group called the Cochrane Collaboration looked into the benefits of vitamin supplements for cataracts. They looked for special studies called randomized controlled trials that compared these products either with each other or with a fake supplement (placebo). They checked whether taking supplements could prevent cataracts or slow their progression.

The researchers analyzed nine studies involving a total of almost 120,000 people between the ages of 35 and 85. The participants used products with vitamin C, vitamin E and/or beta-carotene – that is, products thought to be especially good for your eyes – for up to twelve years.

The results of the studies clearly show that vitamin supplements are not effective against cataracts. People who had taken these products – in some cases for many years – developed cataracts just as often as people who had been taking a placebo.

The supplements also didn't slow down the progression of the cataracts, and they didn't have any effect on eyesight. But some products had side effects: Depending on the study, between 7 and 16 100 people who took beta-carotene had their skin turn yellowish-orange.

This is a sign that they had taken too much beta-carotene.

Although vitamins are important for the body, a normal, balanced diet usually provides enough vitamins. So there's no reason to take dietary supplements to try to prevent or slow down cataracts. The Cochrane researchers considered the results to be so clear that they see no need for further research in this area.

Sources

  • IQWiG health information is written with the aim of helpingpeople understand the advantages and disadvantages of the main treatment options and healthcare services.Because IQWiG is a German institute, some of the information provided here is specific to theGerman health care system. The suitability of any of the described options in an individualcase can be determined by talking to a doctor. We do not offer individual consultations.Our information is the results of good-quality studies. It is written by ateam ofhealth care professionals, scientists and editors, and reviewed by external experts. You canfind a detailed description of how our health information is produced and updated inour methods.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK390313/

Eye Vitamins for Vision

Dietary vitamins may protect against cataract

What foods are good for our eyesight? Many of us try to eat the right foods to slim down and get into shape, but our vision is important too. Does a carrot a day keep the optometrist away?

Let’s separate fact from fiction and get the straight info on vitamins for the eyes. 

Carrots and nutrition for the eyes

You’ve ly heard that eating carrots helps improve our vision. But is this just a myth told by parents everywhere to get their kids to gobble down more vegetables? Not quite. As it turns out, Mom and Dad are right…mostly.

Vitamin A and vision make potent allies. Carrots contain lots of beta carotene and Vitamin A, which can contribute to your eyes’ health and may provide a fantastic source of eye vitamins for macular degeneration and cataracts.

Good sources of Vitamin A and rhodopsin are also abundant in carrots. Rhodopsin is a purple pigment that helps us see in low light situations. Without enough rhodopsin, we wouldn’t be able to see very well at night, even with a cloudless sky and bright full moon.

So this begs the question: Could eating carrots morning, noon and night give you extraordinary powers to see an owl on the blackest nights? Umm, no. While carrots offer many beneficial vitamins for your eyes, they will not turn you into a superhero. (But they can turn your skin slightly orange, if you eat too many!)

In an interesting turn, the myth of carrots and vision stems from World War II. Most food was in short supply then—but not carrots.

The British Royal Air Force credited eating carrots with an increased ability to see the enemy in the dark. This rumor was set in motion to motivate more people to eat carrots.

Today, this vision-related scuttlebutt still exists and, as we’ve seen, there is some truth—along with some exaggeration—to it.

Now that you know more about carrots and our eyes, you might be wondering about other vitamins for your vision.

Other important vision vitamins for good eyesight

If you’re most people, you’re wondering, “Do vitamins for vision work?” The simple answer is, as we’ve seen with Vitamin A in carrots, yes…but in varying degrees. There are vitamins for vision loss that you can take, but none of them produce miraculous results.

Getting enough vitamins is important at every age, especially natural vitamins in your food. The functions of vitamins can be numerous. Their benefits are evident. To help you, we’ve decided to list other vitamins, their benefits to your eyes, and what foods provide them abundantly.

Vitamin C for eyes

Vitamin C is a health powerhouse. You can find it in fruits oranges, kiwi, and strawberries, as well as vegetables broccoli, mustard greens, and peppers. In addition to providing antioxidants, it can also help slow cataracts and provide needed eye vitamins for macular degeneration.

Vitamin E for eye health

Depending on which study you read, Vitamin E may serve as a great antioxidant and agent against cataracts and macular degeneration as well. You can find Vitamin E in many nuts, almonds, peanuts, and pine nuts, along with dried apricots and sunflower seeds.

Lutein for aging eyes

Lutein is a nutrient found in kale, spinach, and turnip greens. It’s also found in our retinas, so it’s an important part of healthy vision. Eating carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (yes, that’s a mouthful!) provide you with great antioxidants and may help against age-related vision problems such as cataracts and macular degeneration. 

As we’ve seen, eating the right vitamins for eyesight can provide an excellent defense against vision problems that often arrive later in life. No matter what age you may be, strive to be proactive in your health. As many experts say, “Eat your colors!” Fresh vegetables and fruit can naturally provide many of the vitamins needed for healthy vision—and make tasty sides and garnishes, too! 

Nothing in this article is to be construed as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the recommendations of a medical professional. For specific questions, please see your eye care practitioner

Source: https://coopervision.com/eye-health-and-vision/eye-vitamins-vision

Increased vitamin C in the diet could help protect against cataracts

Dietary vitamins may protect against cataract

Higher dietary intake of vitamin C has been found to have a potentially preventative effect on cataract progression in the first twin study of cataracts to examine to what degree genetic and environmental factors influence their progression with age.

Cataract is a common condition in which the lens of the eye becomes cloudy as a result of oxidation over time. Whilst this is a natural part of ageing for many, for others it is more severe and causes blurred vision, glare and dazzle that cannot be corrected by glasses or contact lenses.

Cataract surgery is the most common operation performed in the UK with more than 300,000 procedures carried out each year.

The study, led by King's College London and published in the journal Ophthalmology, looked at the progression of cataracts in the eyes of 324 pairs of female twins from the Twins UK registry over 10 years by examining photographs of the participant's lenses that allowed them to analyse the level of opacity of the lens in detail. Participant intake of vitamin C was also measured using a food questionnaire.

They found that those participants who had a higher intake of vitamin C were associated with a 33 per cent risk reduction of cataract progression and had 'clearer' lenses after the 10 years than those who had consumed less vitamin C as part of their diet.

The study, funded by the Wellcome Trust and Guide Dogs for the Blind, also found that environmental factors (including diet) influenced cataract more than genetic factors, which only explained a third of the change in lens opacity.

The fluid in the eye that bathes the lens is high in vitamin C, which helps to stop the lens from oxidising and protects it from becoming cloudy. It is thought that increased intake of vitamin C has a protective effect on cataract progression by increasing the vitamin C available in the eye fluid.

Professor Chris Hammond, consultant eye surgeon and lead author of the study from the Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, said: 'The findings of this study could have significant impact, particularly for the ageing population globally by suggesting that simple dietary changes such as increased intake of fruit and vegetables as part of a healthier diet could help protect them from cataracts.

'While we cannot avoid getting older, diabetes and smoking are also risk factors for this type of cataract, and so a healthy balanced diet and lifestyle generally should reduce the risk of needing a cataract operation.'

Kate Yonova-Doing, the study's first author said: 'The human body cannot manufacture vitamin C, so we depend on vitamins in the food we eat. We did not find a significantly reduced risk in people who took vitamin tablets, so it seems that a healthy diet is better than supplements.'

Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting approximately 20 million people, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa where healthcare is less readily available.

Limitations of the study include that the participants are predominantly of UK-origin and female, reflecting cataract progression between the ages of 60 and 70 years on average, so may not be generalisable.

Also, observational studies this cannot rule out the impact of other factors relating to a healthy diet that may also have had an effect on the progression of cataracts.

Story Source:

Materials provided by King's College London. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/03/160323220408.htm

healthnewschronicle.com