Organ donation

Contents
  1. Organ Donation
  2. Donate Life Organ Donation | Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin
  3. What does it mean to register?
  4. Does my religion support donation?
  5. Is there a cost to be an organ, eye and tissue donor?
  6. Does my social and/or financial status play any part in whether or not I will receive a transplant if I ever need one?
  7. Will the doctors do everything they can to try and save me if they know my wishes to be a donor?
  8. Is organ, eye and tissue donation difficult on the donating family?
  9. Does the donor’s family get to meet the recipient?
  10. Why is it important for me to talk about donation with my family?
  11. Organ Donation Facts & Info | Organ Transplants
  12. What organs and tissues can be transplanted?
  13. Who can be an organ donor?
  14. How can I become an organ donor?
  15. By becoming an organ donor, does this mean that I wouldn't be eligible to receive the best medical care possible?
  16. Are there any costs to the organ donor's family for donation?
  17. Will organ donation disfigure the body?
  18. If I need an organ or tissue transplant, what do I need to do?
  19. What organization actually manages the distribution of organs? What is the process to receive an organ or tissue?
  20. What's involved with becoming a living organ donor?
  21. References
  22. The Benefits of Organ Donation: How Organ & Tissue Donation Changes Lives
  23. 10 Facts About Organ Donation
  24. FACT#2:  Someone who is declared brain dead is clinically and legally dead. Brain death is different than coma or persistent vegetative state
  25. FACT#3: Everyone waiting for a transplant is treated fairly and with respect. Objective medical criteria determine how donated organs are allocated to patients on the transplant waiting list
  26. FACT#4: Even though you may think that signing your driver’s license is the best way to become an organ donor, the recommended way is to enroll with the New York State Donate Life Registry
  27. FACT#5: Don’t assume you aren’t healthy enough to donate; medical staff will do thorough testing at the time of death to make that determination
  28. FACT#6: Any age is the right age to be an organ donor. People are never too old to save lives
  29. FACT#7: There is no cost to the donor’s family or estate for organ donation
  30. FACT#8: Donation does not disfigure the donor’s body
  31. FACT#9:  All major religions approve of organ donation
  32. FACT#10: It is illegal to sell or buy organs in the United States
  33. FROM NEWS 8/WROC-TV ROCHESTER: To boost organ donation, experts help dispel common misconceptions
  34. Organ Donation Facts
  35. Organ Donation and Transplantation Alliance

Organ Donation

Organ donation

There are more than 116,000 individuals on the National Transplant Waiting List in need of a life-saving transplant. During 2016 only 28 percent received their second chance at life.

Individuals on the National Transplant Waiting List are currently waiting up to 10 years for a transplant generally from deceased donors, often causing lengthy delays.

At The Living Bank, we focus on living organ donation where the need is most critical.

  • Kidney. This is the most common living donor transplant, as 82 percent of those on the national transplant list need a kidney
  • Liver. Among patients waiting for an organ, 13 percent need a liver

95 percent of those waiting could potentially be treatment now through living organ donor transplantation.

Instead of waiting, living donor transplants offer a faster, equally effective option for transplant patients.

Learn More

Living organ donation first emerged in 1968, when a kidney from one twin was successfully transplanted into his brother. It has become an increasingly important way to help confront the shortage of organs available for transplants, reduce wait times for recipients, and give people a second chance at a fuller, more independent life.

There are three categories of living donations:

  • Directed. Donors specify to whom they want to donate an organ. They can include biological relatives; a biologically unrelated individual connected to the potential recipient, such as a spouse, friend, or co-worker; or a biologically unrelated person who has heard about someone in need of a transplant.
  • Non-directed (altruistic). Donors give to an anonymous recipient on the national waiting list. The match between donor and recipient is medical compatibility.
  • Paired. This involves two or more pairs of living kidney donors and recipients who are not medically compatible. The transplant candidates “trade” donors so that each receives an organ from someone with a matching blood type.

Learn More

The vast majority of transplants come from organs or parts of organs that are donated at the time of the donor’s death. Because there is a short of available organs and an ever-lengthening waiting list, most people have to wait years for a transplant.

For an individual to become a donor, blood and oxygen must flow through the organ until the time it is recovered. This requires that the potential donor die under circumstances in which an irreparable neurological injury has occurred – typically massive brain trauma such as a stroke, aneurysm, or car accident.

Anyone can be a donor, regardless of their age, race, or medical history, and all major religions in the United States support organ donations. The length of time spent on waiting lists is a function of the severity of the candidate’s condition, time already spent on the list, blood type, and relevant medical information.

Learn More

Whole body donation helps medical researchers and doctors to research and identify better ways to treat a comprehensive range of illnesses and conditions.

Whole body donors contribute to advances in medical and physician training; development of surgical procedures; treatment breakthroughs in areas such as gynecology, colon and liver illness, diabetes, and HIV; improved understanding of how diseases progress; development of life-changing medical devices; cancer protocols; treating spinal injuries; and enhanced drug delivery mechanisms.

Learn More

Source: https://www.livingbank.org/organ-donation/

Organ donation

Did you know, more than 1,800 people in Wisconsin need lifesaving organs? Across the nation, more than 110,000 people are in the same situation, waiting patiently for organs that will save their lives. A single donor can save eight lives and change the lives of more than 75 people. Donation can include kidneys, liver, heart, lungs, pancreas, intestines, tissue and corneas.

As part of a nationally recognized adult and pediatric Transplant Center, we are committed to helping save the lives of people who need transplants to survive.

Choose to save and heal lives with your decision to register. Share your decision with your family and friends. DonateLifeWisconsin.org

Organ donation and innovations have changed the lives of our transplant patients. Learn more about their transplant stories.

What does it mean to register?

Having your name included in the Wisconsin donor registry means that you have authorized the gift of your organs, tissues and eyes upon your death. Registering indicates legal consent for donation. Your gift will be used to save and improve the lives of others.

Does my religion support donation?

Every major religion in the United States supports organ, tissue and eye donation as one of the highest expressions of compassion and generosity.

Is there a cost to be an organ, eye and tissue donor?

There is no cost to the donor’s family or estate for donation. The donor family pays only for medical expenses before death and costs associated with funeral expenses.

Does my social and/or financial status play any part in whether or not I will receive a transplant if I ever need one?

No. When you are on the transplant waiting list for an organ donor, what really counts is the severity of your illness, body size, tissue type, blood type and other important medical information.

Will the doctors do everything they can to try and save me if they know my wishes to be a donor?

Donation is only considered after all efforts to save a patient’s life have been exhausted by the medical team. Organ recovery only occurs after death has been declared. The Organ Procurement Organization is a separate team of people from the medical team that is treating the patient. This ensures that there is no conflict of interest.

Is organ, eye and tissue donation difficult on the donating family?

Donation may provide immediate and long-term consolation, especially in light of sudden, unexpected circumstances. The family members of the donor often feel encouraged that something good has come something tragic.

Does the donor’s family get to meet the recipient?

A donor’s family will be told the age, sex, state and other general characteristics of recipients. If both the donor family and the recipient agree to sign a release of information form, available through the Organ Procurement Organization, Tissue Bank or Lion’s Eye Bank, they may then exchange names, correspond and eventually meet if they so choose.

Why is it important for me to talk about donation with my family?

Many people don’t to discuss end-of-life situations; however, talking about donation is different than talking about death. When you share your donation decision with your family, you are talking about the opportunity to help others and to ensure that your family understands your wishes.

Source: https://www.froedtert.com/donatelife

Organ Donation Facts & Info | Organ Transplants

Organ donation

Organ donation is the process of surgically removing an organ or tissue from one person (the organ donor) and placing it into another person (the recipient). Transplantation is necessary because the recipient’s organ has failed or has been damaged by disease or injury.

Organ transplantation is one of the great advances in modern medicine. Unfortunately, the need for organ donors is much greater than the number of people who actually donate. Every day in the United States, 21 people die waiting for an organ and more than 120,048 (www.unos.org, Nov. 1, 2016) men, women, and children await life-saving organ transplants.

What organs and tissues can be transplanted?

Organs and tissues that can be transplanted include:

  • Liver
  • Kidney
  • Pancreas
  • Heart
  • Lung
  • Intestine
  • Cornea
  • Middle ear
  • Skin
  • Bone
  • Bone marrow
  • Heart valves
  • Connective tissue
  • Vascularized composite allografts (transplant of several structures that may include skin, bone, muscles, blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue)

Who can be an organ donor?

People of all ages should consider themselves potential donors. When a person dies, he or she is evaluated for donor suitability their medical history and age. The Organ Procurement Agency determines medical suitability for donation.

How can I become an organ donor?

Individuals who wish to be organ donors should complete the following steps:

  • You might join a donor registry. A registry is more than just an expression of interest in becoming a donor. It is a way to legally give consent for the anatomical gift of organs, tissue, and eyes. Each time you go to your local Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV), you will be asked, “do you want to make an anatomical gift?” All you have to do is say “Yes.” You can also join the registry at any time by filling out a “Document of Gift” form from the BMV. For more information, go to www.lifebanc.org and click on donor registry. Donor registry information for any state might be obtained from www.donatelife.net.
  • Sign and carry an organ donor card. This card can be downloaded at: www.organdonor.gov.
  • Let your family members and loved ones know your desire to be a donor.
  • You might also want to tell your family healthcare provider, lawyer, and religious leader that you would to be a donor.

By becoming an organ donor, does this mean that I wouldn't be eligible to receive the best medical care possible?

Not at all, your decision to donate does not affect the quality of the medical care you will receive.

Are there any costs to the organ donor's family for donation?

There is no cost to the donor’s family or estate for the donation of organs, tissue, or eyes. Funeral costs remain the responsibility of the family.

Will organ donation disfigure the body?

The recovery of organs, tissue, and eyes is a surgical procedure performed by trained medical professionals. Generally, the family may still have a traditional funeral service

If I need an organ or tissue transplant, what do I need to do?

If you need a transplant, you need to get on the national waiting list. To get on the list, you need to visit a transplant hospital. To find a transplant hospital near you, visit the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) website (www.unos.org). Every transplant hospital in the United States is a UNOS member.

The transplant hospital's doctors will examine you and decide if you are a good transplant candidate. In addition to criteria developed for some organ types by UNOS, each transplant hospital has its own criteria for accepting candidates for transplant.

If the hospital's transplant team determines that you are a good transplant candidate, they will add you to the national waiting list. You can get on the waiting list at more than one transplant hospital, and UNOS policies do permit “multiple listing.” However, be sure to check each transplant hospital's guidelines about who will be the primary care provider.

Next, you wait. There's no way to know how long you will wait to receive a donor organ. Your name will be added to the pool of names. When an organ becomes available, all the patients in the pool are assessed to determine compatibility.

What organization actually manages the distribution of organs? What is the process to receive an organ or tissue?

UNOS maintains the national Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN). Through the UNOS Organ Center, organ donors are matched to waiting recipients 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

When an organ becomes available, the local organ procurement organization sends medical and genetic information to UNOS. UNOS then generates a list of potential recipients, such factors as:

  • Blood type
  • Tissue type
  • Organ size
  • Medical urgency of the patient’s illness
  • Time already spent on the waiting list
  • Geographical distance between the donor and the recipient

The organ is offered first to the transplant center with the candidate who is the best match. The transplant team decides if it will accept or refuse the organ established medical criteria and other factors, including staff and patient availability and organ transportation.

If the transplant center refuses the organ, the transplant center of the next patient on the list is contacted and the process continues until the organ is placed. Organs are distributed locally first; if no match is found, they are offered regionally and then nationally.

What's involved with becoming a living organ donor?

A living donation, such as the donation of one healthy kidney or a segment of a healthy liver from a living human being to another, is arranged though the individual transplant centers according to criteria they have in place. An Independent Donor Advocate will represent the interests and well-being of the potential living donor.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 12/13/2016.

References

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Source: https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/11750-organ-donation-and-transplantation

The Benefits of Organ Donation: How Organ & Tissue Donation Changes Lives

Organ donation

Many people have heard that organ donation can change lives, and we’ve ly all heard an inspiring organ donation story. Statistics tell us that one person can donate eight life-saving organs, as well as tissue and corneas that can drastically improve the lives of another 75 people.

But do you understand how significant of an impact each gift can truly make?

A donated heart helps people struggling with life-threatening heart failure, including congenital defects and valve dysfunctions. Heart recipients have a five-year survival rate of 70 percent or more, and can enjoy a considerable improvement to their quality of life.

For example, one-year-old Maggie McLaren received a life-saving heart transplant after her one working heart ventricle left her so weak she could not even crawl. Maggie’s donated heart gave her a new chance at life and allows her to run and swim. Her parents are grateful for the gift she was given and are determined to help her understand its impact.

A donated kidney can make all the difference in the life of someone with kidney failure. Instead of spending several hours in dialysis three or four times a week, a kidney recipient can enjoy a healthier, happier life with a working kidney that lasts an average of 12 years.

Melissa Tuff “hit the ground running” after her kidney transplant, which put an end to nine years of in-center dialysis.

Melissa was diagnosed at age 16 with Rapidly Progressive Glomerulonephritis, and it wasn’t until she received her new kidney that she realized how sick she was, and how much of a difference a healthy kidney made!

A donated liver can save the life of someone with liver failure, which can happen suddenly or over time due to long-term illness or disease. Over 70 percent of transplanted livers last over five years, and half are still functioning after 20 years.

Katie Arnson, for example, received her a liver at four months old after being diagnosed with Biliary atresia as an infant, and is now in her 20s.

The liver she received brought her back from the brink of death and has allowed her to be a healthy college student who thinks about her donor’s gift every day.

A donated lung (or lungs) can be a life-saving gift to someone with unhealthy or damaged lungs.

Damage can be caused by a range of diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); a single or double-lung transplant may become someone’s only hope for survival.

Ben Hayes was dying of a rare lung disease at just 28 years old when he received his lung transplant. The transplanted lungs replaced his failing ones and allowed him to travel, hunt, spend time with his family — and volunteer for Gift of Life.

If someone has trouble controlling blood sugar, a transplanted pancreas may be used to restore normal insulin production and drastically improve their quality of life. A pancreas transplant is often done simultaneously with a kidney transplant if the patient is at risk for future kidney damage. A transplanted pancreas can last 10+ years, on average.

One person who benefited from this gift is Andrea S, whose Type 1 diabetes created health problems that forced her to drop school and go on disability. After receiving a kidney from her mother and a pancreas from a stranger, Andrea works full time, pursues her love of photography, and encourages others to become organ donors.

Intestinal transplants are used for patients with intestinal failure that cause life-threatening complications. Intestinal failure can be caused by a range of diseases, so both children and adults can be effected.

Recipients 10-year-old Matisse Reid are able to enjoy happier and healthier lives after their transplants; prior to her transplant, Matisse had been fed intravenously her entire life because of a rare medical condition.

The condition caused her a great deal of pain, and her body would not allow her to digest food. After her transplant, however, Matisse is able to eat and explore her love of cooking!

The most common and successful transplant, cornea transplants can restore vision after other approaches have failed to relieve painful swelling or to correct vision.

Gina G, for example, needed a cornea transplant after she developed an ulcerated cornea, which is an open sore causing intense pain.

Receiving a donated cornea restored her vision and allowed her to continue her dream of playing basketball.

Tissue donation (including tendons, skin, and bones) restores hope and mobility for tens of thousands of men and women each year. Tissue can be used to repair combat wounds for veterans, save patients with life-threatening burns, and rebuild joints.

Tissue and organ donors are treated with the utmost care and respect, so families can still have open casket funerals if they wish. Their gifts are gratefully accepted by recipients Nicole Carlton, who was at risk for paralysis after slipping a disc in her neck. A tissue donation stopped her pain and prevented her from becoming paralyzed from the waist down.

Organ and tissue donation is a gift of life that can help people Maggie, Ben, and Gina live healthy, happy lives; unfortunately, a shortage of donors results in an average of 22 people in the United States dying each day while waiting for a transplant.

There are many misconceptions about becoming an organ donor that prevent people from signing up, which we try to dispel through our common questions page.

Registering to be an organ donor is a safe and thoughtful decision that can be done despite medical conditions or age (the oldest cornea donor was over 100!)
 

You can register online in just a minute. If you would to sign up to give the gift of life,  sign up for the Michigan Organ Donor registry here!

Source: https://www.giftoflifemichigan.org/about-donation/benefits-organ-donation

10 Facts About Organ Donation

Organ donation

Doctors and nurses in the emergency room have a single mission: Tosave your life, not someone else’s. They don’t know—and would never ask—whether you had signed to be an organ donor. The emergency department doctors are completely separate from doctors who perform organ transplants.

FACT#2:  Someone who is declared brain dead is clinically and legally dead. Brain death is different than coma or persistent vegetative state

Brain death occurs when a person has an irreversible, catastrophic brain injury, which causes total cessation of all brain function (the upper brain structure and brain stem).

Laws strictly prohibit doctors who have declared a patient brain dead from participating in the recovery and transplantation of donated organs.

 The protocol to be declared brain dead is the same whether a person is an organ donor or not.

Until organs are recovered for transplant, mechanical support (a ventilator) continues to supply oxygen to the organs.

THE MACHINE IS NOT KEEPING THE PATIENT “ALIVE” (brain death, as we said, is irreversible); it is merely keeping the organs viable until they can be recovered.

The use of the phrase “life support” does NOT, therefore, apply to brain death. “Life support” may only be appropriate when there is a chance of recovery, for example, in the case of coma.

FACT#3: Everyone waiting for a transplant is treated fairly and with respect. Objective medical criteria determine how donated organs are allocated to patients on the transplant waiting list

A national system matches donated organs to people on the waiting list a number of factors including the donor’s blood type and body size, the severity of illness of potential recipients, tissue type, distance, and length of time someone has been on the waiting list. The race, ethnicity, gender or social status of the donor or potential recipients IS NEVER taken into account.

FACT#4: Even though you may think that signing your driver’s license is the best way to become an organ donor, the recommended way is to enroll with the New York State Donate Life Registry

Signing your driver’s license is helpful but it’s possible no one will be able to find your driver’s license if the situation should arise where you could be an organ donor.

That’s why you are encouraged to enroll with the New York State Donate Life Registry, a confidential computerized database. When you enroll, your decision is legally binding.

It’s also important to inform your family or next-of-kin about your decision so they know your wishes.

One organ donor can save up to eight lives, so please enroll in the Donate Life Registry. You may do so when you next visit the New York State DMV or when you register to vote.

FACT#5: Don’t assume you aren’t healthy enough to donate; medical staff will do thorough testing at the time of death to make that determination

Don’t rule yourself out prematurely: Whatever your medical history may be, you should still enroll to become an organ donor.

If you have an illness such as diabetes, hypertension or even cancer, medical professionals and medical tests at the time of your death will determine whether your organs are suitable for transplantation.

It may turn out that certain organs aren’t suitable for transplantation, but others may help save lives.

FACT#6: Any age is the right age to be an organ donor. People are never too old to save lives

No matter how old you are, you may be able to become an organ donor. In fact, organs have been donated and transplanted from donors in their 90s. As in the case of your medical condition at the time of death, doctors and medical tests will determine what organs can be donated to help others. RELATED LINK: New Yorkers Over 50 Years of Age Urged to Become Organ Donors

FACT#7: There is no cost to the donor’s family or estate for organ donation

If you agree to donate your organs, your family will never be charged for costs associated with donation. Finger Lakes Donor Recovery Network will work closely with the hospital to ensure that this policy is adhered to.

As would occur in situations not involving organ donation, your family (or your insurance company) is responsible for paying for medical care up to the point of death. Those costs are sometimes misinterpreted as being related to organ donation. Funeral costs remain the family’s responsibility.

FACT#8: Donation does not disfigure the donor’s body

Throughout the entire donation process, the donor’s body is treated with care, respect, and dignity. Donated organs are removed surgically in a meticulously controlled operating room environment. Open-casket viewing is possible following donation.

FACT#9:  All major religions approve of organ donation

Leaders of all major religions consider organ donation to be the final act of love and generosity toward others, one of the noblest acts of charity.

Find out your religion’s views on organ donation.

FACT#10: It is illegal to sell or buy organs in the United States

Anyone found guilty of black market crimes will be rigorously prosecuted to the full extent of the law. In fact, unauthorized removal of organs under any circumstances is illegal.

RELATED LINK:

FROM NEWS 8/WROC-TV ROCHESTER: To boost organ donation, experts help dispel common misconceptions

By MAUREEN MCGUIRE

November 23, 2015

At the Campus Center at St. John Fisher College, sophomore Noah Michaels is taking in a few facts about organ donation.

Among them? You’re never too young, or too old, to be a donor.

“It’s kind of tough to think about organ donation,” says Michaels. “Because I’m young and from what my doctor tells me, I’m healthy!”

“There may come a day where I don’t need my organs, but someone else can benefit and have a good life I’m able to because I’m healthy,” Michaels says.  “So I thought it was a no-brainer after that.”

In Rochester, approximately 1 in 3 people is registered to be an organ donor, far less than the national average of 1 in 2.  

Thanks to people Noah, the tide may finally be changing.  He didn’t let misinformation keep him from saving lives.

>> READ THE FULL STORY AND SEE THE VIDEO FROM WROC-TV

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Source: http://www.donorrecovery.org/learn/organ-donation-facts/

Organ Donation Facts

Organ donation

At this moment, more than 113,000 people in the U.S. are waiting for an organ. One more person is added to the national waiting list every 10 minutes.

Each of these people is in desperate need of a kidney, liver, heart, or other organ. About 20 people a day in the U.S. die before that organ becomes available.

Organ donors are always in short supply. There are far more people in need of a transplant than there are people willing to donate an organ.

Most of the organs that are available come from deceased donors. When you fill out an organ donor card with your driver's license, you're agreeing to donate all or some of your organs if you die.

A smaller number of organs come from healthy people. More than 6,000 transplants from living donors are performed each year.

You might have wondered about donating an organ — either to a friend or relative who needs an organ right now, or by filling out an organ donor card. Before you decide to become an organ donor, here is some important information you need to consider.

Here are a few questions you might be asking if you're considering organ donation:

Who can donate an organ?

Just about anyone, at any age, can become an organ donor. Anyone younger than age18 needs to have the consent of a parent or guardian.

For organ donation after death, a medical assessment will be done to determine what organs can be donated. Certain conditions, such as having HIV, actively spreading cancer, or severe infection would exclude organ donation.

Having a serious condition cancer, HIV, diabetes, kidney disease, or heart disease can prevent you from donating as a living donor.

Let your transplant team know about any health conditions you have at the beginning of the process. Then they can decide whether you're a good candidate.

Do my blood and tissue type have to match the recipient's?

It's easier to transplant an organ if the donor and recipient are a good match. The transplant team will give you a series of tests to determine whether your blood and tissue types are compatible with the recipient's.

Some medical centers can transplant an organ even if the donor's and recipient's blood and tissue types don't match. In that case, the recipient will receive special treatments to prevent his or her body from rejecting the donor organ.

How can I become an organ donor?

To donate your organs after death, you can either register with your state's donor registry (visit OrganDonor.gov), or fill out an organ donor card when you get or renew your driver's license.

To become a living donor, you can either work directly with your family member or friend's transplant team, or contact a transplant center in your area to find out who's in need of an organ.

With kidney transplants, it’s sometimes possible to do a “paired” kidney exchange. For instance, if someone wants to donate a kidney to a loved one but isn’t a match, they may be able to donate their kidney to someone else, and in turn their loved one gets a kidney that is a good match from another donor.

If I donate an organ, will I have health problems in the future?

Not necessarily. There are some organs you can give up all or part of without having long-term health issues. You can donate a whole kidney, or part of the pancreas, intestine, liver, or lung. Your body will compensate for the missing organ or organ part.

As for kidneys, there is some data showing that kidney donors may be slightly more ly, over the long term, to develop high blood pressure, preeclampsia, and chronic kidney disease. But the data on that is limited and mixed.

If donating an organ would put your health at risk in the short term or long term, then you would not be able to donate.

Will I be paid for donating an organ?

No. It's illegal to pay someone for an organ. The transplant program, recipient's insurance, or recipient should cover your expenses from tests and hospital costs related to a living organ donation. The transplant program can go over what coverage is available for additional medical services. Some or all of your travel costs may also be covered.

Will organ donation after death mean I can't have an open-casket funeral?

No. The surgical cuts used for organ donation will all be closed.

Will my organ donation after death incur any costs to my family?

No. The costs of the tests and surgery related to the donation will be covered by the recipient — most often by the recipient's insurance. Your medical care and funeral costs are paid for by your family.

Does signing a donor card have an impact on the quality of medical care I get at a hospital?

No. When you are in a life-threatening situation,

the medical team that is treating you is separate from the transplant team. Every effort to save your life will be made before an organ donation is considered.

When you're considering becoming a living organ donor, think very carefully about these pros and cons:

Pros. Probably the greatest benefit of organ donation is knowing that you're saving a life. That life might be your partner, child, parent, brother or sister, a close friend, or even a stranger.

Cons. Organ donation is major surgery. All surgery comes with risks such as bleeding, infection, blood clots, allergic reactions, or damage to nearby organs and tissues.

Although you will have anesthesia during the surgery as a living donor, you can have pain while you recover. Pain and discomfort will vary depending on the type of surgery. And you may have visible, lasting scars from surgery.

It will take some time for your body to recover from surgery. You might have to miss work until you're fully healed.

As you decide whether to donate an organ as a living donor, weigh the benefits and risks very seriously.

Get as much information as you can before making a decision. The transplant center should fully explain the organ donation process to you. You should also be assigned an independent donor advocate who will make sure you know your medical rights.

Make sure you ask a lot of questions throughout this process. It's important for you to fully understand the surgery and how becoming an organ donor might affect your future health.

Finally, remember that this is your decision — yours alone. Don't let anyone sway that decision. Even if a friend or loved one is very sick, you have to consider how donating an organ might affect your own life. Remember that even though the donation process has started, you have the right to stop it at any time if you change your mind.

SOURCES:

United Network for Organ Sharing.

American Society of Transplantation web site: “Who can be an Organ Donor?”

Department of Health and Human Services.

American Transplant Foundation web site: “Facts and Myths.” . 

Organdonor.gov: “Organ Donation Statistics.”

HIV.gov: “Organ Donors – A Q&A with HIV Transplantation Experts,” “Kidney Transplant from Living HIV-positive Donor to HIV-positive Recipient: What Does this Mean?”

Annals of Internal Medicine: “Mid- and Long-Term Health Risks in Living Kidney Donors: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.”

Transplantation: “Cardiovascular disease and hypertension risk in living kidney donors: an analysis of health administrative data in Ontario, Canada.”

© 2020 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved. Overview

Source: https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/organ-transplant-donor-information

Organ Donation and Transplantation Alliance

Organ donation

The Alliance is the recognized leader within the organ donation and transplantation community dedicated to providing engaged learning, innovation and collaborative leadership for future advancements in organ donation and transplantation.

We envision restoring lives by honoring the gift of life, ending deaths on the organ transplant waitlist, improving access for those in need, and maximizing post-transplant survival.

The Alliance Board of Directors is comprised of expert leaders from several key national organizations from across the organ donation, transplantation and healthcare community.

They are the driving force behind the Alliance’s successful programs and activities.

These valued partners work closely with the Alliance team to achieve optimal results on key issues that impact the donation and transplantation industry.

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  • Currently, more than 115,000 men, women and children are awaiting organ transplants in the United States. On average 22 people die each day waiting for an organ transplant.
  • More than 67,000 Multicultural Patients
  • More than 2,000 Pediatric Patients
  • 34,771 Organ Transplants Performed in 2017
  • 16,473 Organ Donors in 2017
  • More than 82,994 corneas donated for transplant in 2016
  • More than 1 million tissue transplants are done each year and the surgical need for tissue is steadily rising.

  • The Alliance has brought together the key organizations and individuals involved in organ donation and transplantation over the last six years.

    It will be essential that the sharing of best practices and research continue through the Alliance so that we can improve and increase the number of transplantable organs for those on the waiting list.

    –Howard Nathan – President and CEO, Gift of Life Donor Program

  • The  Alliance is a vital organization that unites the donation and transplantation community under one umbrella.–Thomas A. Nakagawa, M.D., FAAP, FCCM

  • Our growth as a community of practice has resulted in the Alliance’s guidance and collaboration with national organizations to foster the mission of saving more lives and enhancing donation and transplantation awareness–Thomas A. Nakagawa, M.D., FAAP, FCCM

Source: https://organdonationalliance.org/

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