Question: Is There A Difference Between The Rebel Flag And The Confederate Flag?

What is the real Confederate flag?

The Confederate Congress specified that the new design be a white field “…with the union (now used as the battle flag) to be a square of two-thirds the width of the flag, having the ground red; thereupon a broad saltire of blue, bordered with white, and emblazoned with mullets or five-pointed stars, corresponding in ….

What did the Confederate flag look like during the Civil War?

Although variations of the Battle Flag pattern were numerous and widespread, the most-common design, known as the “Southern Cross,” featured a blue saltire (diagonal cross), trimmed with white, with 13 white stars—representing the 11 states of the Confederacy plus Missouri and Kentucky—on a field of red.

What did the Confederates stand for?

It is also called the Southern Confederacy and refers to 11 states that renounced their existing agreement with others of the United States in 1860–1861 and attempted to establish a new nation in which the authority of the central government would be strictly limited and the institution of slavery would be protected.

What is the Mississippi state flag called?

Magnolia FlagOn January 26, 1861, Mississippi adopted the Magnolia Flag, featuring the native tree on a white field; the canton was blue with a central white star, thus incorporating the Bonnie Blue design.

Why the South is called Dixie?

Dixie, the Southern U.S. states, especially those that belonged to the Confederate States of America (1860–65). The name came from the title of a song composed in 1859 by Daniel Decatur Emmett; this tune was popular as a marching song of the Confederate Army, and was often considered the Confederate anthem.

What were the Confederates fighting for?

Status of the states, 1861 Slavery was a major cause of disunion. Although there were opposing views even in the Union States, most Northern soldiers were mostly indifferent on the subject of slavery, while Confederates fought the war mainly to protect a Southern society of which slavery was an integral part.