Question: Why Do Truckers Say Breaker 19?

Are CB radios making a comeback?

Many thought citizens band radios would disappear after the 1970s, along with pet rocks and disco.

But not only are they still around, they are making a comeback.

CB radio sales have increased steadily during the last three years, a trend not seen since the 1970s..

What channel do most truck drivers use?

Channel 19Channel 19 is the most commonly-used channel by truck drivers on highways, to the point that some radios even have a dedicated button to bring up channel 19 instantly. In most areas of the U.S. other channels regionally used for this purpose include 10, 17, and 21.

What’s your 6 mean?

Your intuitions are correct; the phrase ‘watch your six’ does indeed mean ‘watch your back’. It refers to the 6 position on the face of a clock. If you were standing in the center of a clock face, facing the 12 position, the 6 position would be immediately behind you.

What is your 411?

noun. informal North American. the 411The relevant information or the truth. ‘when guys come to you for the 411 on your friend, tell them they should talk to her’

Why do truckers use channel 19?

Most truckers use the unofficial channel 19 (27.185 MHz) to communicate. This channel offers highway traffic information from truckers and other drivers.

What does 10 100 mean on a CB?

10-100. Bathroom Break (CB radio) 10-100. In Hot Pursuit/Chase (Alabama Public Safety Radio Code) Copyright 1988-2018 AcronymFinder.com, All rights reserved.

What does breaker breaker 19 mean?

May be followed by either the channel number, indicating that anyone may acknowledge (e.g. “Breaker One-niner” refers to channel 19, the most widely used among truck drivers), or by a specific “handle”, which is requesting a particular individual to respond.

What are some trucker sayings?

Trucker Slang: Top 20 Funny Sayings July 13 2017Town Clown—Local Police Officer. … Motion Lotion—Fuel. … Skate Board—Flat Bed Trailer. … Jumpy Juice—Coffee. … Wiggle Wagon—Truck with More Than One Trailer. … Organ Donor—Motorcyclist without a Helmet. … Salt Shaker—Snow Plow. … Gator Guts—Shredded Tire in the Road.More items…•

What’s your location in police code?

Police 10 CodesCodeGeneral PurposeAPCO (Association of Police Communications Officers)10-19Return to _____(In) Contact10-20LocationLocation10-21Call ( ) by PhoneCall ( ) by Phone10-22DisregardDisregard108 more rows

Do truckers still use Channel 19?

Sometimes truckers use channel 19 for east-west travel and channel 17 for north-south travel. This is especially common in California. CB also used to be the tool of choice for convoys, and sometimes they still are, but in many cases cell phones can be used for this function today.

What does 42 mean on CB?

A: If you hear a truck driver say “42” on their CB radio, it’s just another way to say “Yes, or OK.” There are hundreds of other popular CB slang phrases – to learn more, check out the links below or browse the rest of our online CB slang dictionary.

What’s your 1020 mean?

“What’s your twenty?” comes from the days of Citizens’ Band Radio. It means “Where are you?” . “What’s your twenty?” comes from “10–20” (ten-twenty) which is part of the Ten Code used by C.B.ers borrowed and adapted from the police and emergency services.

Do truck drivers talk to each other?

The CB radio was the most popular way to communicate with each other before the 2000s. … Some use a more evolved radio system, such as a satellite radio service like Sirius or XM, to replace their CB radio. All in all, truckers love to talk and, thanks to technology, drivers have endless possibilities for communicating.

What does 10 4 mean on a CB?

message receivedRoger that! 10-4 is a way of saying “message received” in radio communications. It’s also used as a way to “you got it.”

Why are truckers so rude?

Truck drivers are often perceived to be rude for one simple reason: inertia. Trucks have a lot of inertia and therefore take a lot longer than cars to safely slow down, speed up, or change lanes. Such slow responsivity can seem like rudeness to other drivers. Public Domain Image, source: OSHA.